Stephen King on the Importance of J.K.Rowling

94

Aug 10, 2007

Posted by SueTLC
Uncategorized

In a new and lengthy piece, author Stephen King has written a column for Entertainment Weekly, reflecting on Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows, and in particular what J.K. Rowling has brought to children and reading. This article, which does contain spoilers for the final Harry Potter novel, first starts with a discussion of the spoilers and the early reviews which caused such a fury, with Mr. King noting:

The reviewers themselves were often great ” Ms. Kakutani ain’t exactly chopped liver ” but the very popularity of the books has often undone even the best intentions of the best critical writers. In their hurry to churn out column inches, and thus remain members of good standing in the Church of What’s Happening Now, very few of the Potter reviewers have said anything worth remembering.

He then goes on to focus on how he feels part of the secret of the success of the novels should be attributed to both the growth and growing up of the characters, and the development of Jo as a writer herself.

Rowling has been far more successful, critically as well as financially, because the Potter books grew as they went along. That, I think, is their great secret (and not so secret at that; to understand the point visually, buy a ticket to Order of the Phoenix and check out former cutie Ron Weasley towering over Harry and Hermione). R.L. Stine’s kids are kids forever, and the kids who enjoyed their adventures grew out of them, as inevitably as they outgrew their childhood Nikes. Jo Rowling’s kids grew up…and the audience grew up with them.

While some of the blogs and the mainstream media have mentioned that Rowling’s ambition kept pace with the skyrocketing popularity of her books, they have largely overlooked the fact that her talent also grew. Talent is never static, it’s always growing or dying, and the short form on Rowling is this: She was far better than R.L. Stine (an adequate but flavorless writer) when she started, but by the time she penned the final line of Deathly Hallows (”All was well.’‘), she had become one of the finer stylists in her native country ” not as good as Ian McEwan or Ruth Rendell (at least not yet), but easily the peer of Beryl Bainbridge or Martin Amis.

This very good column then concludes with Stephen King giving his thoughts on why writers like J.K. Rowling are important to children and reading.

I began by quoting Shakespeare; I’ll close with the Who: The kids are alright. Just how long they stay that way sort of depends on writers like J.K. Rowling, who know how to tell a good story (important) and do it without talking down (more important) or resorting to a lot of high-flown gibberish (vital). Because if the field is left to a bunch of intellectual Muggles who believe the traditional novel is dead, they’ll kill the damn thing.

It’s good make-believe I’m talking about. Known in more formal circles as the Ministry of Magic. J.K. Rowling has set the standard: It’s a high one, and God bless her for it.

This issue of Entertainment Weekly will be on newsstands starting today.





50 Responses to Stephen King on the Importance of J.K.Rowling

Avatar Image says:

Gah, the ability this man has to make me cry when he speaks so eloquently about Jo is unbelievable.

Avatar Image says:

I completely agree Kimberly! As a fan of Stephen as well, it’s nice to see the support he puts forth for Jo!

Avatar Image says:

Thank you. Thoroughly enjoyed reading this article.

Avatar Image says:

His past two articles on Potter have given me goose bumps. Cheers for Stephen King!

Avatar Image says:

Wow! The best article I ever read! I totally agree with King!

Avatar Image says:

“J.K. Rowling has set the standard: It’s a high one, and God bless her for it.”

Here Here.

Avatar Image says:

SK is a gifted writer. His words about HP and Jo ring true.

Avatar Image says:

Isn’t he amazing???!? To just sit down with him and get into that head of his…He wrote everything I felt about Deathly Hallows.

Thanks Stephen!

Avatar Image says:

I’ve never been a huge Stephen King fan – his work is in general too grueseome for me. But ever since I’ve been aware of his stance on Harry Potter, I’ve read his columns and such very carefully, and I’ve come to appreciate his imagination, and his spirit, very much. Reading his thoughts on Jo, now and previously, certainly has earned him a lot of respect.

I also recommend Tina Jordan’s thoughts on DH on the EW site – very well put and I wholeheartedly agree with her. And then, in today’s NYT, there are very brief excerpts/summaries of that plethora of fake Harry Potter’s that are circulating in China. When I first heard of all those blatant copyright violations, I was very angry; now I realize they are so pathetically, unbelievably bad that nobody really should take them seriously. The summaries are worth a look, though: I burst out laughing at some points at the staggering absurdity of it all … :)

Avatar Image says:

Stephen King is a true Harry fan. He’s critical, but gives credit where credit is due. He’s one of the fans that share that level of obsession that JK talked about. I think that is a huge compliment from one critically acclaimed author to another.

Avatar Image says:

I am not much of a Stephen King fan, although The Stand remains one of my favorites (albeit one of the most TERRIFYING books I have ever read). His recent stuff lacks the ooomph of his earlier work, but I greatly appreciate his friendship with, and his respect for, Jo. Thank you Mr. King. Long live Harry.

Avatar Image says:

Although I haven’t read his books (a lot of them seem too dark and gruesome, as someone above me put it, for me), but I really agree with that article. Reading will never be dead, folks!

Avatar Image says:

i’ve read and also loved some of Stephen King’s works (Pet Sematary as the most)—i have high regard for his creative style as well. his thoughts on Jo’s writing has been very articulate and emotional. i could only concur. =) kudos to these wonderful authors!

Avatar Image says:

Wow. That made me cry! Thanks Stephen for voicing out what I, too, exactly feel about Deathly Hallows and JK Rowling. I salute you!

Avatar Image says:

I haven’t read any of his books but I loved this article he wrote. I completely agree with what he said about those reviewers. They just write reviews for the sake of writing them and few really take the time to enjoy the magic of Jo’s books. ha and you just can’t compare Jo to Stine; I mean Goosebumps and Fear Street were ok but they aren’t works of literature like the HP books. I also grew out of them but grew up with Harry.

Avatar Image says:

Completely brilliant article as usual, Mr. King. Best line: ”...if he had been an adult, the cops would have taken him away either to the drunk tank or to our local Dreamboat Manor…” BWAHAHAHAHA!!!

Avatar Image says:

I agree what he’s saying about adult books today – they have 100 pages of so of *crap; pointless details that have nothing to do with the story and just bore the hell out of you. They’re not all that way, mind you, But I’d rather take my chance reading a children’s book.

(Class adult books rule though)

Avatar Image says:

Ironically, too, Christopher Hitchens’ official review came out today in the NYT book review. Hitchens is somebody who I respect a lot, normally, but who simply does not get Jo’s magic, and comes across in this review – unfortunately, because I do not think he normally is – a pompous, over-intellectual academic who’s trying way too hard (he points out some interesting tidbits, but for the most part entirely missed the point). It’s almost as if he tried to demonstrate King’s thoughts about reviewers.

Avatar Image says:

I love Uncle Stevie. From Shakespeare to the Who. Both he and JKR are on my list of if-I-could-host-a-dinner guests. I think I’d find them in a quiet corner of my fantasy mansion, comparing publishing and book-signing experiences, and giggling like school kids.

For those who are easily spooked, and haven’t tried SK, check out his 7-book series of “The Dark Tower.” There are fewer things that go bump in the night, and the tone is both heroic and tragic. And there’s no waiting. He took 24 years(!) to complete this series, but it is All Done now. And it’s his second magnum opus, next to “The Stand,” IMO. Maybe better.

Avatar Image says:

Stephen King is amazing. I love him. He doesn’t let jealously get to him, like some other authors I could mention…, but he still criticises JK constructively with no malice and a love for the books. I have tremendous respect for him.

Avatar Image says:

I think King sold Jo a little short. He does, indeed, praise her work, but I think comparing her to RL Stine is not all that flattering. And saying that the reason her books are so successful is that her characters grew up—? I can allow that that might have been one reason, but Jo’s writing is so much more than that. She combines fantasy, reality, humor and mystery. She brings in universal themes and addresses concepts that everyone deals with in their heart. She creates an imaginary world that seems so real, we expect to be able to stumble upon it in real life. She creates a place where we can examine how it feels to be scared and to mourn and to fail and to win, all from the safety of our favorite armchair by the fire. These books are classics and will remain in print longer than RL Stine’s, unless I miss my guess.

I seem to remember that in King’s novel It, that he mentioned in this article, the kids came back as grown-ups to again fight the beast they thought they’d conquered as kids. So King’s characters grew up, too. But kids don’t read his novels (good thing, too! It is definitely NOT a children’s book). Rowling’s works appeal to all because, along with the universal themes, she keeps the content appropriate for everyone, without talking down to kids or adding unnecessary gore and sex for adults. This is another of her great triumphs.

As I read the HP books to my 9 year old son, I don’t say the swear words out loud (though we had an interesting discussion last night about Merlin’s pants). I either skip the work and re-write the sentence so he doesn’t even know it was there, say “very bad word” in place of the swear word, or replace it with something like “darn”, depending on the context. I’m not sure what I will do when I get to the word King mentions that Molly says toward the end of the book. My son already knows what it is (he’s not afraid of spoilers, he knows who dies (he read it on Wikipedia) and it’s kind of hard not to see if you flip through the books, being in all caps. I’m glad this is the strongest language in the books, though I still question the use of swear words at all. What’s good about how they’re used in the HP books is that they are true to real life. The young kids don’t use them, but they start to as they get older, and it also varies from person to person and in situations. Flitwick doesn’t come out with one in the middle of class, and Mrs. Weasley doesn’t use them when talking to her children. Some characters use them more than others (Ron more than Hermione, for instance) and I loved the line about how the Weasley’s gnomes knew some excellent swear words but Ron thought they learned them from Fred and George.

All in all, I think King could have spoken more highly of Jo’s work. But maybe he’s just a bit jealous.

Avatar Image says:

I don’t think SK is right. JKR has always been greatly talented. And she is the most talented and greatest author a century. I don’t need any other writer’s comment to know that.

Avatar Image says:

i don’t know why but i love reviews that cut up other crappy reviews.

as for christopher hitchens, the guy claims that women are incapable of being funny so there’s quite a few things that he doesn’t “get.” don’t get me started on his political views.

Avatar Image says:

go jk go jk go jk go jk go jk go jk go jk go jk go jk go jk go jk go jk go jkgo jk go jk go jk go jkgo jk go jk go jk go jk go jk go jk go jk go jk go jk!!!! HARRY RULES

Avatar Image says:

I love this line: “Jo Rowling set out a sumptuous seven-course meal, carefully prepared, beautifully cooked, and lovingly served out.”

I couldn’t agree more!

Avatar Image says:

I totally agree this an awesome review. Although some people say these are fanatsy JK acaully tacling the dark heart of the real world(thats a direct quote from www.jkrowling.com go there to hear jks true voice.) These are tackling wat teens go through to adult hood and wat is going on in the real world. Its not just entertainment they personally give me confidence. I can go out and stand up for myself. Ever since Harry came out whenever i need to escape i pick up a Harry book. S King is right as the characters grow up the kids and rest of the audience grew up with them. Harry grew from a ingorant 11 year old wizard to saving the entire wizarding world by defeating Voldmont.S king thanks for the great review not many people appreciate J.K. Rowling and her novels.

Avatar Image says:

Mrs Lovegood above obviosuly did not read Sk’s article all that well. SK did not compare JKR to RL Stine. He contrasted them. He basically said that RL Stines books are Happy Meals, while JKRs books are 5-star full-course dinners.

And to say that SK is jealous of JKR is one of the most absurd things I have ever heard. First of all, SK has had nothing but praise for JKR over the years, and second, he has nothing to be jealous of. The man has written over 50 novels, all of which are international best sellers.

Avatar Image says:

So many other modern novelists pan Rowling that it’s refreshing to hear from someone arguably just as famous as her. King shows us he still appreciates a good story, and I always love reading his thoughts.

Avatar Image says:

I can’t believe someone else cried reading King’s article! Since the book came out, I’ve been waiting for him to weigh in, and now that he has, it’s finally struck me that it’s all over. No more books, no more Harry. Until the next couple of movies and the Universal theme park, of course. But what a supreme gift Rowling has given us all, and how smart King is to have noticed. His article, along with EW’s review of the book, sum up to perfection why the Potter books mean so much to so many. Nothing becomes an international phenomenon by accident, particularly a book! I guess our only consulation is that Rowling’s still out there, she’s still brilliant, and who knows what’s germinating in that spectacular brain of hers.

Avatar Image says:

In his article, Mr. King says the following:

“R.L. Stine rode a wave of kid popularity, partly fueled by the fledgling Internet, to become perhaps the best-selling children’s author of the 20th century. Like Rowling, he was a Scholastic author, and I have no doubt that Stine’s success was one of the reasons Scholastic took a chance on a young and unknown British writer in the first place. He’s largely unknown and uncredited…but of course John the Baptist never got the same press as Jesus either.”

Talis says King is contrasting Rowling and Stine. It’s true, in my first post I said he compared them. Maybe we’re both right, or maybe we’re both wrong. The passage I’ve quoted above seems to give Stine the credit for Rowling being discovered in the first place, as if the wonderful story she’d written wouldn’t eventually have gained such a following, let alone get published at all, if it hadn’t been for Stine. I find this hard to swallow and even harder to agree with. I admit to never having read any of Stine’s books, but I just can’t believe that Stine paved the way for Harry Potter in the way that King suggests.

Then after this wonderfully flattering analysis, he says that Rowling has improved in her writing ability but she still isn’t as good as a couple of British writers I’ve never heard of, and then he goes on later in the review to spend two whole paragraphs criticizing elements of her writing.

When I said the King might be jealous, I meant that, while he’s written lots of books and had best sellers, he’s never had a book as popular as the Harry Potter books, and those were Jo’s first published works. That has to be kind of hard to take, when he’s worked so hard to get to his status as well-known author. I do realize he says many good things about Jo and her books. I did read the article. I just thought he minimized her success by his analysis that the success was because her characters grew up, while Stine’s stayed as kids. I don’t think that’s the main reason for her success. Whether King is jealous or not, and I fully admit I could be wrong about that, I think it’s clear that the Harry Potter books are best sellers for lots of other reasons than that the characters simply grew up.

Avatar Image says:

I loved the pictures that went with the review too. I may go back to King. He scared me silly when I was young. Never picked up another of his books. Loved just reading the review.

Avatar Image says:

SK says “Like Rowling, he was a Scholastic author, and I have no doubt that Stine’s success was one of the reasons Scholastic took a chance on a young and unknown British writer in the first place”

Mrs. Lovegood says “The passage I’ve quoted above seems to give Stine the credit for Rowling being discovered in the first place, as if the wonderful story she’d written wouldn’t eventually have gained such a following. I find this hard to swallow and even harder to agree with. I admit to never having read any of Stine’s books, but I just can’t believe that Stine paved the way for Harry Potter in the way that King suggests.”

I think King gives Scholastic the credit for finding and promoting another writer like Stine, that would get kids reading. And rightly so. JKR’s manuscript had already been rejected by 5 (I think) publishers before her U.K. publisher accepted it. There are many, many very good works that are rejected in any given year. That’s just the intangible cost of the business. And in that world, Stine set the bar for a popular series (also called chapter books) that got young readers into reading. And JKR has badly bent that bar!

Mrs. Lovegood says: “Then after this wonderfully flattering analysis, he says that Rowling has improved in her writing ability but she still isn’t as good as a couple of British writers I’ve never heard of, and then he goes on later in the review to spend two whole paragraphs criticizing elements of her writing.”

Yes, JKR is sometime clunky with language, with descriptions, and character conversations. The camping bits in 7 do drag the plot, but there are many gems of language and image that really sparkle. The difference between 1 and 7 is massive—-so much so that I can’t read 1 and 2 any more. JKR’s a writer, so this critique is no news to her. And SK has had similar criticism leveled at him (he can’t writing ending for nuts!). Again, it’s part of the business that they’re in.

Mrs. Lovegood says: “When I said the King might be jealous, I meant that, while he’s written lots of books and had best sellers, he’s never had a book as popular as the Harry Potter books, and those were Jo’s first published works. That has to be kind of hard to take, when he’s worked so hard to get to his status as well-known author.”

You don’t remember the re-release of SK’s “The Stand: The Complete and Uncut Edition” in 1990? The version that’s now the standard? That caused quite a buzz then. Now it’s no big deal if a writer or director does a revision of their first work. And the sales of Carrie (1974) in paperback sold 1 million in its first year; in 1974, this was really big! I remember them all.

Like, JKR, he’s been writing since childhood, and has 30 years of best-sellers under his belt-—and a lot more criticism than she’s endured. Notwithstanding the 20-year age difference between them, I consider them peers, and I think he does too. I think he admires her immensely and understands, like few people on the planet can, exactly what she has wrought-—not only a series of books, but movies, t.v. shows, video games and a impact to world culture. No jealousy there.

Avatar Image says:

I don’t like authors commenting on their competitors, as to me it’s just like dropping the name of another book in their novel for the prestige. To even bring R L Stine into comment as well, is just poor. His books got a lot of people reading that weren’t interested in so call ‘literary masterpieces’ and as an adult I’ve frequently been put down for reading childrens books. The fact that they have motivated me to buy them and lots of other fictional books is the wonderful thing! Such books influence our culture for decades or more.

Avatar Image says:

“I’m glad this is the strongest language in the books, though I still question the use of swear words at all. What’s good about how they’re used in the HP books is that they are true to real life.”

Surely they are not really true to adolescent life. Well not to adolescent life as I remember or as I hear it when my teenagers doors are shut and they think I am out of range!

Michael

Avatar Image says:

Dear, dear, Mrs. Lovegood is certainly getting a dressing-down, and I hate to add to it (particularly since she seems to have adopted the persona of dear sweet Luna’s dead mum), but her lengthy diatribe against swearing is SO off the mark. The very power of swearing is in its judicious use. Hermione, to my recollection, never resorts to it; she has her extensive academic knowledge to express herself in other terms. Ron swears the most, and one would argue that he is probably the least intellectual of the three (notwithstanding his mastery of wizard’s chess). Additionally, he has his naughty older brothers as models. And certainly no one would begrudge Harry an expletive now and again - his life has been grueling. Note how swearing appears more and more often in subsequent books - for good or bad, this reflects reality as the children mature.

I shall be very disappointed if Mrs. Lovegood doesn’t step up and say ‘BITCH’ aloud when Mrs. Weasley confronts Bellatrix. It’s a powerful word, made much more powerful by Mrs. Weasley’s disinclination to swear (even in the face of overwhelming provocation!) and by the import of the moment. My own 10-year-old daughter, while not as sheltered as Mrs. Lovegood’s 9-year-old son, was shocked and yet found the tone absolutely appropriate (and even a little funny, coming from Mrs. Weasley). I think Mr. King hit the nail on the head when he stated that it was a perfect adult moment—what mother wouldn’t react in this way?

The idea of King and Rowling being competitors, by the way, is ludicrous. They don’t write in the same genre. Would the Rolling Stones consider Yo-Yo Ma a competitor? Even two writers of the same genre probably don’t consider themselves competitors. Goodness, it’s not as though a reader chooses only one book or one author to spend time with. If anything, exposure to one writer would open to the door to others.

Avatar Image says:

I have read a few of Stephen King’s works and I like him as not only a storyteller, but I have great respect for his massive inventory. There was a period in the 80’s and 90’s where a new Stephen King book came out every six months and many, like “IT” and “The Stand” were a bit longer than Order of the Phoenix. He’s really only slowed down since some idiot ran him down with a truck. But anyone who has had that kind of life in literature knows what he’s talking about and rather than dismissing Jo as a “childrens author” who appeals to adults too, he points out that her writing spans the generations UNLIKE R.L. Stine who is rarely ready by anyone over the age of eighteen.

I am thrilled that Stephen King has taken the point on letting the world know that the works of JK Rowling are not just this generation’s answer to Star Trek geeks. When a fandom is based in literature rather than TV the quality and level of intelligence of that population is extrordinary. If you doubt this, read some fan fiction or listen to PotterCast. There is some really deep thinking going on. Melissa and Sue are passionate and eloquent. Yeah, even you, John Noe…Wit beyond measure is man’s greatest treasure…and your insight into the the world of Harry Potter is dead on, even if it’s masked with that sharp wit. So along with Stephen King, I am proud to count myself as a fan of the Harry Potter series and JKR.

Avatar Image says:

Never heard of S.King before 2005, started liking him in 2006(after read his thoughts on Harry Potter and Jo), And after reading this article I am starting to get fond of him. Although would never read his work(too gruesome for me) but this article was very entertaining being a review of DH. I will definitely say Jo is the most powerful minister of ‘Ministry of Magic’.

Avatar Image says:

“Hermione, to my recollection, never resorts to it; she has her extensive academic knowledge to express herself in other terms”

Hermione doesn’t swear? That’s news to me. I quite enjoyed her swearing in DH!

Avatar Image says:

Ahh Mrs. Lovegood:

I am so sorry you missed the thrust of SK’s praise for JKR.

The beauty of JKR’s work, as stated by SK, is that the characters in the story grow up as the story goes along. This dosent happen offstage as they do in IT. Nor do they stay eternally young as R.L Stine insists on penning his own. No, Harry, Ron, Hermione, and all the rest grow up, live and yes even die as the pages turn. That is a core fact of the books, and honestly its one of the reasons the books caught my attention to begin with. The only other authors I know of who use this literary device in their children’s books are Madeline L’Engle and C.S. Lewis both avowed masters of the genre.

As far as his being jealous of her… ummm Excuse me how is that supposed to work? An established writer of adult horror/thriller fiction is going to be jealous of an established writer of fantasy/fiction. despite the fact that they write for seperate genres and demographics? Why because she has sold a lot of books and had movies and games based on her work? Last I checked SK was in the game because he loves writing, not to put points on some mythical ‘me against the world’ scorecard. If anything SK would be thrilled that JKR is opening up so many people to the idea of reading for pleasure, it means more people walking into the bookstore who might just pick up one of his MANY titles, that tend to run the gamut from macabre, through fantastical, right up to classic suspense.

SK is, and will remain one of, if not the most powerful writers of his generation. He will always be one of the most proliffic writers in the history of writing. JKR is easily one of the strongest writers of this generation. I am fortunate enough to be able to read them both in a time when I can still ask either of them a question… with a reasonable expectation of getting an answer and a smile for my trouble. What amazing times we live in.

P.S. Anyone who has read the Dark Tower books, should go back through SK’s catalogue and try to find how many books reference his (suprisingly also) 7 volume masterwork.

Avatar Image says:

King is a GENIUS. He put into very eloquent words everything worth saying about the way Harry has been reviewed over the years (they always seem rushed, and missing the flavour of the books, don’t they?) He gave totally accurate constructive criticism of book 7 (which like the rest of the series, has flaws but is overall brilliant) The point he made about the success of the series being that the children are allowed to age is one that I was dimly aware of in the back of my mind, but which I now realize is going to be stupendously important to Harry’s legacy. He writes beautifully about Harry’s place in literature, Jo’s sense of humour…a fantastic, amazing article that puts the rest of us muggles in our place. I guess that’s why he’s the bestselling author! He really should do more criticism and reviewing, he’s brilliant at it. In fact, he should WRITE THE FOREWORD for Jo’s Harry encyclopaedia. Can someone start an online petition? I can think of no one better.

Avatar Image says:

Hmm, I think this was generally a very good article, but I was kind of annoyed by his extensive use of (somewhat mixed) metaphors. And although I know it wasn’t meant in a derogatory manner, something about repeatedly comparing R.L. Stine to John the Baptist (even in a metaphorical sense) rubs me the wrong way.

I know this is kind of picky, but I also found myself annoyed by King’s apparent obliviousness to the fact that “A Cauldron Full of Hot, Strong Love” appeared in the books prior to Deathly Hallows. Given that he seems to be promoting himself as just as much of a fan as the rest of us. Maybe I’m misinterpreting the context he used.

All in all, I definitely appreciate his sentiments about reviews, JK Rowling’s appeal, and the fact that reading will probably endure as a children’s pastime. However, I found the article to be too much of a mishmash of pop-culture references, and a wee bit too patronizing for my taste.

Avatar Image says:

Perfect words Mr. King. Thank You! We could not agree more! We love you too! :)

Avatar Image says:

It’s OFFICIAL! the guy knows what he’s talking about. ‘ear! ‘ear! best article on HP, I guess.

Avatar Image says:

I usually enjoy any review that actually reviews the work as opposed to rehashing plot. I’ve loved Stephen King for about 30 years now…and J.K. Rowling ever since Harry was born. It’s pretty simple; I love a good book.

Avatar Image says:

The articles OK but the praise is so over the top I mean how can he say that JK Rowling is a better stylist than M AMIS wtf? JKR’s style is purely functional.

Avatar Image says:

Lots of people here are using the word “gruesome” to describe King’s books. While that is probably true of many of his works (I haven’t read most of them), I would like to recommend “The Girl Who Loved Tom Gordon.” It’s fairly short, it has a wonderful protagonist in a plucky nine-year-old girl who gets lost in the woods and has to rely on her wits to survive, and I wouldn’t say it’s particularly gruesome. It has a couple of vivid images, and some creepy moments, but it’s a really nice read.

I very much doubt that King is jealous of Rowling, given that he invited her to host “An Evening With Harry, Carrie, and Garp” with him.

Avatar Image says:

i love him and jk!

Avatar Image says:

And after you’ve read “The Girl Who Love Tom Gordon,” re-read Faulkner’s short story “The Bear”(if you didn’t read it in high school). Then catch a baseball game.

Avatar Image says:

I re-read it his story again when I finally got the magazine in hand. Overall good but as with the missing “cauldron full of love” as a song previously mentioned he is wrong about the Robinson Crusoe syndrome. The water is from the augamenti spell taught by Flitwick and used in HBP, the stairs that turn into a slide uses the same magic as the stairs in the girls dormitory when a boy tries to visit(OOTP). Not sure about the Fiendfyre but it might be related to the fire army that Luna Lovegood says that Fudge has in OOTP.

Avatar Imagestevenk12468 says: He's a genius. I'm curious about some of the "better" authors he's mentioned. I'm going to have to check one of their books out. I can't imagine a "better" writer than J.K. Rowling. Stephen King is an amazing writer; he's in her league, but a "better" writer? Interesting...

Write a Reply or Comment

Finding Hogwarts

The Leaky Cauldron is not associated with J.K. Rowling, Warner Bros., or any of the individuals or companies associated with producing and publishing Harry Potter books and films.