Recycled Paper Required for Finnish Editions of “Deathly Hallows”

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Jan 24, 2008

Posted by EdwardTLC
Uncategorized

The New York Times is reporting the release of the Finnish editions of the final book in author J. K. Rowling’s series, “Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows,” printed on Finland paper has been blocked due to lacking ‘ecologically friendly certification’ standards of the particular paper used in the production of the book. It was the author’s wish, according to Tammi, the Finnish publishers of the novels, that paper be used which was ‘derived from wood grown and harvested in a way that promotes sustainable forest development.’ A spokeswoman from Tammi is quoted in the article explaining that, while the first Harry Potter novels were printed on recycled paper, “This time it’s a more specific demand.” Readers will remember prior to the book’s release in the States, US publisher Scholastic announced their commitment to print “Deathly Hallows” on Forest Stewardship Council (FSC) certified paper, the same paper Ms. Rowling wished the Finnish editions to be printed on, according to the article. Scholastic also recently reiterated their commitment to environmentally responsible publishing practices, with the continued use of FSC certified materials.

The Finnish publication of “Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows” is set for March 7.

Thanks Izzy!





18 Responses to Recycled Paper Required for Finnish Editions of “Deathly Hallows”

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i think its nice that they use recycled paper =]

Avatar Image says:

Cool, I assume JKR will let the ECO paper fly from Australia around the world up to Finland with her Private Jet which of course only flies with biogas made by cowpats.to save the nature.

Avatar Image says:

Congratulation, JK! We need this for a better world! :P

Avatar Image says:

March 7!!!!???? Even worse than spanish translation!!!!!!

Avatar Image says:

Jo is my hero!

She rocks for doing this.

Avatar Image says:

Great! Nothing else to be said!

Avatar Image says:

Yeah but now arent they going to have to reprint the books which makes the tree consumption twice as much?

Avatar Image says:

It’s great that they’re using recycled paper! It’s a step in the right direction for book publishing and environmental preservation!

Avatar Image says:

very good of jo to go with the recycled paper but i got to feel for the finnish fans for having to wait so long to get a copy in their native tounge, but that being said i would not be surprised at all to see some of them having gotten copies in other languages the speak and read

Avatar Image says:

@ Ascatal: I agree with you 100% jo is doing the right thing… It must be hard for fans… As living in the States we dont have that problem

Avatar Image says:

So who’s blocking the release? And who’s major blunder was it to allow them to be printed on the wrong paper? Isn’t someone at Tammi responsible for hiring the printers? Gads, I agree with Matt and hope they don’t make them recycle these “bad” books, just to reprint them on the primo paper.

Avatar Image says:

PK says to herself, “It does help to read the article.” Jo is blocking the release. Hmm. I hope that the rest of the story is reported…I’d like to know what happens.

Avatar Image says:

Ok, so have any books actually been printed? If not, fine. If so, it strikes me as extremely stupid to not let those book be released.

OTOH, how much does it cost, in money and resources (fuel, etc), to import this paper? Will enough trees be saved that this even makes sense? The Finns do use recycled paper, after all; it’s not like the chop down new trees just for the books.

Avatar Image says:

Finland has an OK paper recovery system but it is a large country (with an area appr. that of Great Britain and Ireland together) with a small population (5 million, or less than 10 % of GB + Ireland). This means that we don’t generate as much recovered paper as more densely populated countries. It may well be that in order to fulfil JKR’s demands, recovered paper will have to be imported, and it is justifiable to question the ecology in that.

75% of Finland’s total area comprises forest. The annual growth of those forests is more than what is harvested for industrial processing and fuel.

Avatar Image says:

There are no blocks or halts or anything… The printing will go on normally, it won’t affect the publication schedule. Apparently Finnish eco-paper wasn’t good enough for Rowling so we had to transport the special paper all the way from Germany.

It’s a bit annoying that the article gives the idea of printing being stopped, when that’s not the case at all.

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juvenis said: “It’s a bit annoying that the article gives the idea of printing being stopped, when that’s not the case at all.”

Actually, I didn’t get that idea from the article. The way Leaky characterizes it makes it sounds a bit like that, but the article itself doesn’t

Avatar Image says:

The article says that the first Finnish books were printed from recycled paper but that is not what is being said for this printing. Now the books must be printed from “paper certified by the Forest Stewardship Council as being derived from wood grown and harvested in a way that promotes sustainable forest development”. I have an award winning Tree Farm in NH that has wood grown and harvested in a way that promotes sustainable forest development. We are not “certified by the Forest Stewardship Council” but are certified by the Tree Farm System in the USA. Even though our wood is grown and harvested for a sustainable forest, we would not qualify because we don’t have that “specific” certification. Certification systems are many, most are expensive and the Finnish wood may be certified under a different system.

Perhaps when Jo visits the USA for the Harvard Commencement, she’d like to see my Tree Farm. We can see the Boston skyline from here. Hint, Hint.

Avatar Image says:

Actually, it’s not that bad to wait for the book. We Finns are very patient. :D

And yes, many (like me) have bought the English version of Deathly Hallows. Jaana Kapari-Jatta, translator, just wants the job to be done well.

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