Translated Edition of “Deathly Hallows” Hits Stores in Poland

114

Jan 26, 2008

Posted by EdwardTLC
Uncategorized

More news today regarding the translations of the Harry Potter series, very soon readers in Poland will be able to get their hands on translated editions of the final Harry Potter book, as the novel is set to hit book shelves at midnight on January 26th. The Polish Press is reporting, however, some stores have begun to set copies out early. The Polish Press Agency notes a statement from Media Rodzina, the novel’s publisher, saying that nothing can be done at this point, as they had formed a ‘gentlemen’s agreement’ with the sellers. This edition is set to have 784 pages and a first printing of 650,000.

Thanks to Aleksandra!





42 Responses to Translated Edition of “Deathly Hallows” Hits Stores in Poland

Avatar Image says:

Early release! Lucky them!

Avatar Image says:

Yeah, total awesome!

I’m from Poland and I couldn’t wait longer fot this amazing book! And I have already bought it two hours ago, it’s wonderful! It has american cover, but different title: “Harry Potter i Åšmiertelne Relikwie”. Enjoy!

So… I’m going to start reading :D

Avatar Image says:

Hmmph. They get it early? In America it would have been a huge news thing, likely a lawsuit or two. Foolish of the publishers to not get a contract, at least that is how it seems to me. Oh well. Enjoy it in your native tongue, those of you from Poland!...

...Polish is a language, right?

Avatar Image says:

Well, I would say it`s a bit of justice to sell them right away a few days earlier.

That ones who are lucky to understand english have read DH half a year ago !!!

I myself would have gone crazy to not read it the day it went on sale.

Enjoy your reading in polish, Agunia, I guess that you have already had the pleasure to read it in english as you are sharing your comment in Leaky.

Avatar Image says:

Only 650,000 copies in the Polish first edition? Poland is a country with 38,5 million people… but then again they’re mostly catholic, and the pope has banned the Harry Potter books. Is that why the publisher in Poland is so careful with the 1st edition?

Avatar Image says:

Eva Hedwig, thank you very much! You are right, I have already read it in English, but it’s not the same as book in my native, polish language. :)

And something about unfair booksellers – it’s horrible. My friends bought the book even 6 days later! And Media Rodzina says that nothing can be done at this pont… Terribly! Of cours, I bought HP7 in a rightly way.

Avatar Image says:

“Poland is a country with 38,5 million people… but then again they’re mostly catholic, and the pope has banned the Harry Potter books. Is that why the publisher in Poland is so careful with the 1st edition?”

No, not becouse of that. In Poland books are really expensive and probebly they printed so little becouse they’re afraid that they won’t sell it all. Second: most of children borrow this books from public librairies or firends… some of them read in in English, some illegal Polish translation by Swistak Army in Internet… Third: not many people buy/read books here – they prefer go to library or something. So generally publisher is afraid that they won’t sell whole 1st edition.

Avatar Image says:

It’s the last book… With the previous books, if the booksellers will start to sell it earlier they lost their contracts to sell next books. Yes – Polish is a language :) Well – at now it’s the biggest number of copies. I think it’s enought.

Avatar Image says:

Yeah, book is amazing. And we have one different drawing above the epilogue. It’s quite unexpected, i think. We have not drawing of platform 9 3/4, but we have a Harry, Ron and Hermione (in a background are some paintings).

Avatar Image says:

No Bjorn. That’s not the reason. We in Poland very rearly have big books’ sales. It may shock you but 650000 of first edition is extremly high for my country. Usually books that sale over 10000 copies are seen as bestsellers, so… you can see: our bookmarket is to some extent neglected, because we generally read or rather BUY very little books and if they were written by foreign author it’s even worse then, cause they are (for the most Poles) astronomic expensive. If you have only 700 or 800 PLN for month to live on, then you will not buy a book that costs 90 or 100 PLN for sheer enjoyment.

Avatar Image says:

I am so happy when I think about all these people in my country who can finally read Book 7. I’ve read DH in English and I had to translate it for my younger sister, she wouldn’t give me a rest :) I’d love to buy polish version too, but, as many people have said, it’s too expensive. My parents wouldn’t let my buy it because I already have it in English and they consider having two versions of one books a waste of money. Anyway, I can’t wait to talk about DH with my friends who didn’t read it in English :]

Avatar Image says:

aillinne : When you say 700 – 800 PLN to live on, is that the typical average salary in Poland? If so, 90 PLN for HP book is a frightening ratio. Average salary in UK (I think) is 20000 – 25000 GBP. With a new hard back book costing 17GBP (paperbacks average £6 – £10). Furthermore, I bought the DH book on midnight opening release at ASDA store for £5 as all retailers were competing in price to absolutely stupefying levels (way below their trade price hence loss of profit from the books itself). I suppose there are none of that sort of competition in Poland then? I hope its only the books which are so expensive there and not everyday conveniences. Are there any midnight parties held or is there less “razzmatazz” on the release than other countries?

Avatar Image says:

i’m from argentina and i have already read the book in english twice. but some friends that dont really speak english well and want to read it have to wait a really long time!! it isn’t fair south america is left last… nobody’s got a clue when it’s coming out in spanish hahaha

Avatar Image says:

@ Professor Potter

700 or 800 PLN – I mean netto for person pro month.

For year 2007 the year’s income was less than 17000 $ pro citizen.

This is for first thanks to the fact that we are now in EU and we have huge economic emigration to Western Europe, where we can earn much more money as in our motherland. (Well… that changes too… for our missfourtune)

Second: we have none such a thing like well-established middle-class.You either make a packet or you’re person on a low income, so the reasonable average doesn’t mirror the truth.

“I suppose there are none of that sort of competition in Poland then?”

Of course there is competition! We are not communistic country anymore! But it doesn’t change the fact that if I were going to buy all the books I’d like to see on my bookshelf I’d end up moneyless! (Emmm… O.K. It’s true for any buyer in any country, if you’re stubborn collector! ;))

“Are there any midnight parties held or is there less “razzmatazz” on the release than other countries?”

Oh pleaseeeeeeee!!! There are dammit midnight-blue-kind-of-stagy-parties! :)

Actually JKR has resigned of her part of earnings, so the prize is two times lower than it’d be if she didn’t. And THAT is one point to the mistery why HP-books sale so well.

The most expensive books in Poland are the academic/scholarly ones. You can’t imagine how difficult life this means for students here! We know of course how to get out of this mess, but… let’s say… khem, khem!... some things better to left unsaid… ;)

Avatar Image says:

Oops! Wrong! some things better to left unsaid… ;) I’ ve meant: some things better to leave unsaid… ;)

Avatar Image says:

Professor Potter: I’d say a typical salary in Poland is somewhere around 1000-1200 PLN, but these values vary. Famous books cost at least 50 PLN (HP books for example, 100 PLN was the cost of English version here) – it may seem not much but many parents would rather buy their children new clothes or so. Living here is pretty expensive, most of my friend’s families have to take loans to live in a satisfactionary way. But again, variety of salary is really huge. There are no price competitions when it comes to HP books. They have their prices printed on back cover and it’s forbidden to give a client account higher than 10% of that price.

Avatar Image says:

Amazing how conversation can float from Harry Potter to salaries in Poland. Now I can tell my boyfriend that this is an officially educational website. I learn something every day from this web site and not just Harry Potter stuff.

Avatar Image says:

Haha, you’re right, Egypt :) But I guess it’s a good thing. There’s not much HP stuff to discuss.

Avatar Image says:

To be honest, I think the early release of some translated copies is a good thing. When you think about it, they’ve really had to wait long enough.

Avatar Image says:

Well Agunia, I understand that it’s amazing to read a book in the mother tongue, there are some things you really understand better.

My leguage is german and even I dislike to read the book in german I find it useful to read it one time, as there are always some sentences I have not understood properly in english and sometimes I am laughing at a joke that I have read month before (Lavenders Uranus, U no poo..)

Przemek, I understand that it sounds weird for a parent to buy the same book twice, but beeing honest we parents buy a lot of things for our pleasure too and a book is a jewel you can enjoy over and over again, its very well spent money. When I see that my kids really want and apreciate something I buy it if I can.

Professor Potter this is a bit out of topic: I am looking for the document “A year in the life of JKR” like crazy and I cant found it anywhere, not Google, not Emma, not Youtube. Have you have any idea where else can it be seen ?

Avatar Image says:

Przemek & aillinne.. Now I feel much less naive! That is very informative. Though in hindsight, I did ask a couple of “duh” questions havent I? i wondered if there were less celebrations because most people have read the English version anyway (is that a wrong assumption too?) but of course there would still be celebrations, what the heck was I thinking! its Harry Potter, we would all even celebrate Prof Flitwick’s birthday! I do feel sorry for the students and anyone with scholarly interests in Poland though, despite the “backdoor” access too reading and libraries. I’m sure in time such a situation will improve, fingers crossed :-)

Avatar Image says:

Hey Eva, this is indeed off topic so we’ll make this a last digression. You probably remember that I had put the show up on youtube under my “theycallmemrglass” channel. But Youtube took it off on the request of an ITV associate citing copyright protection so of course I have to respect that. Only ITV website was showing it but I guess it must be gone now? I can only perhaps suggest checking a bit-torrent portal website. I so so so wish everyone can watch the documentary as it is soulful. Oh btw, the title is “JK Rowling: A year in the life”

Avatar Image says:

Hi Prof. Potter, thanks a lot, what is a torrent portal website ?

Avatar Image says:

@ Professor Potter

Well… uhm.. I’ve gone all crazy in July indeed and so now I’m not dying to know how it ended, cause I know it of course :) Sure the midnight-parties might have been “damped” a little bit, but the reason is the winter I think. You know: it’s something different to celebrate on warm July night and on the cold January one.

“i wondered if there were less celebrations because most people have read the English version anyway”

Most not, but many for sure :)

Avatar Image says:

Hey, I’m from Egypt and we have the translated Harry Potter and Deathly Hallows here by a publisher called “Nahdet Misr” and i hope you write this in the site Can u Plz….........................

Avatar Image says:

Thanks for the insight, Sonia and aillinne. I do wish all polish people to prosper in life and income, and get cheaper books in the future! It’s especially troublesome to hear that academic books are so expensive, when they’re the basis of knowledge, and knowledge is what brings a country forward in the long run. So let’s hope your government understands this and do something about the high price of books – and your low income!

I read the english version at the same time it was released in Europe. I consider myself lucky to be able to read english, and I really prefer english books in their native language. I don’t bother to buy the translated edition to my native langauge. Why should I, when the english is the best anyway? Besides, all the names and things are changed in the translated ed. and I just get confused. I hear others here talk about “Humlesnurr”... and I go – “Who?” Then they tell me that’s Dumbledore. And Hogwarts becomes “Galtvort”. Ha-ha-ha. So it’s just confusing and therefore I don’t read the translated books in my own language.

Cheers from Norway. :)

Avatar Image says:

no, super książka kocham Dracon’a Malfoy’a (polish) yeaah, cool box I love tom felton :D

Avatar Image says:

The character’s names are translated too??? But why? What about the British culture of the story – is that retained? I’m sure it is but thinking about it translators have got a tough job as they are not just translating language but also cultural nuances and jokes, right? But there also has to be a balance of what and what not to change/translate.

Avatar Image says:

Eva Hedwig – you’re right about book being a jewel, but you have to remember that we’re talking about HP book. Not so many people in my country consider it a book that can teach you something important. Most of people still believe it’s book for children, some of them will even laugh at you if you mention that you read HP. What’s more, in this specific case my parent’s really can’t buy me this book, we have financial problems. If I had money, I’d rather buy a book I haven’t read before :]

Avatar Image says:

Professor Potter – character’s names are not translated in Polish version (at least most of them aren’t). The form “Dracona Malfoya” comes from declination. It looks like that (letters are cases): M. Draco Malfoy D. Dracona Malfoya C. Draconowi Malfoyowi B. Dracona Malfoya N. Draconem Malfoyem Ms. Draconie Malfoyu W. Draconie Malfoyu It may seem strange, but that’s Polish language :)

Avatar Image says:

Eva, there is a slight learning curve for using bit-torrents so I will just point you to http://www.dessent.net/btfaq/#where for info and I personally use Azureus program and isohunt.com to search for torrents. Warning though, stay on the righteous track when using this useful shairing network, ok ;)

Avatar Image says:

@ Przemek

Our non-Polish brothers and sisters in Potter won’t know what the letters before Malfoy’s name mean. Maybe I’ll clear this up:

M. Draco Malfoy – Mianownik/Nominative case D. Dracona Malfoya – DopeÅ‚niacz/Genitive case or Possessive case C. Draconowi Malfoyowi – Celownik/Dative case B. Dracona Malfoya – Biernik/Accusative case N. Draconem Malfoyem – NarzÄ™dnik/Instrumental case Ms. Draconie Malfoyu – Miejscownik/Locative case W. Draconie Malfoyu! – WoÅ‚acz/Vocative case

Avatar Image says:

I’m from Poland too. In our country books are really expensive. That’s why most of people borrow them from libary. I didn’t read HP in English but I’m going to try. HP and DH is great!

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@ Professor Potter

The names of the characters are generally left as in orginal, but we have some cosmetic changes like: Cornelius Fugde became Korneliusz Knot ( Fudge for Knot – it was necessary for joke to work in first book), Lucius is Lucjusz, but Severus didn’t become Sewer (which is astounishing to me for all given names that come from Latin were translated into Polish – meaning: they got Polish suffixes like -usz). By the way the same goes for Occlumency – oklumencja and Legilimency – legilimencja.

On the other hand we have practically all Magical beings translated into Polish, for exemple: Blast-ended Skrewts – sklÄ…tki tylnowybuchowe, Crumple-Horned Snorkack – chrapak krÄ™torogi, Bowtruckle – nieÅ›miaÅ‚ek

Fred and George’s inventions, wizard (and witches) related stuff as names of streets (Diagon Alley – ) underwent changes too.

But don’t worry – we’ve the touch of Britishness in the books. :)

Avatar Image says:

Indeed we have. Those books are very British, even translated. HP books, Doctor Who… You British people know how to make something really great.

Aillinne – maybe we know each other? Have you ever been to magiczne.pl? If not, you’re officially welcomed :) You’ll find me there if you want to. “Brothers and sisters in Potter” should stay in contact ;)

Avatar Image says:

@ Przemek

Thanks for invitation, but I’ve never been a part of Polish branch of HP fandom and this will remain so.

Avatar Image says:

No, no, it’s not what you think. Magiczne.pl (in spite of its name) is not about HP. There’s one part of this forum dedicated to HP, but in general Magiczne is an unique place where people talk about everything and make friends. And I mean it – I’ve met great people there, obsessed with indie rock, Welsh language, World of Warcraft or whatever you can imagine. Give us a chance and visit magiczne.pl. It’s really not about HP anymore. It’s more like a place where friends can meet from time to time. Almost like a big family :)

Avatar Image says:

Ha,ha now now Przemek , don’t go encourage the Brits by using the word “great” and British in one sentence! You know how easy it is to raise our egos higher than what is healthy for us ;-) JK Rowling is a great great storyteller. She just happens to be British and living on an Island that has the extraordinary audacity to call themselves Great Britain, which i suppose is one of our amusing traits. To balance things out I would say every country is Great in their own way…except for Great Britain who are great in every way :) Ok I’m kidding about that last par. No, really I am…

Avatar Image says:

I’m from Poland and I bought polish edition of DH at the midnight 25th. Translation of that kind of book takes normaly about 6 months but our translator did it in 2,5 months! That’s a great job! I’ve also read english version twice but having your favourite book in your native language is awesome! It was worth of waiting! Greetings for all HP fans!!!

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Professor Potter said:

“The character’s names are translated too??? But why? What about the British culture of the story – is that retained? I’m sure it is but thinking about it translators have got a tough job as they are not just translating language but also cultural nuances and jokes, right? But there also has to be a balance of what and what not to change/translate.”

I don’t know why they insist on translating character names – expecially in this country, where people can read english before they’re 10 yo. And I forgot to mentian that almost all other names are changed too – places, spells, you name it. But the british feel or culture is retained in the translated books, I think. I may be wrong, because I haven’t read them translated. :)

But I know the translators do a great job. They even get most of the jokes to function as originally intended, I hear. And they get something to say about copyright and republishing of the translated edition too, because the translated text is their artwork. So I have the greatest respect for them.

Then again, I think something will be lost in the translation. Personally, I want to experience the text in its original language if I can, to come nearer to understanding the author’s thoughts.

Avatar Image says:

I’m the guy from Egypt. here the price of the translated is very good compare to the English one . And the names are not translated , however, my english is good and when u read the story in the original language is the best.

Could anybody now how to send anything to the site plz answer me

Avatar Image says: Hi. I know this article is from long time ago and probably no one reads the comments… But I just wanted to say that Polish people are not as dumb as they seem to other nations; I learned English, which is not that hard, after all. The matter is that everything depends on single unit; if I want to learn English, I do so. Please, do not hold your opinions about a nation on few people. Dumb people are everywhere. Ok, about some comments; Poland is a Catholic country. Many weird old ladies that are completly brain washed call Harry Potter series "adventures of three young satanists". but I didn't know that pope prohibited HP. I don't think so... Last thing; there are people in Poland who make 700-800 PLN per month. But it is not an average, Aillinne, and I don't know how can you say such a thing. (Dobrze wiesz ze tak nie jest; punkt widzenia zalezy od punktu siedzenia - ale oficjalne dane to nie sa.) I guess you (you all, I mean) will profit when reading something about Poland on wikipedia.org, for example. P.S. I read both original and translated versions of Deathly Hallows, and I loved them. Notwithstanding, I am sure that the movie will be, as usual, a disaster.

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