Japanese Translation of “Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows” Released

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Jul 23, 2008

Posted by EdwardTLC
Uncategorized

The Japanese translation of “Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows” was released today in Japan, just two days after the one year anniversary of when the first copies of the book were originally released. Reports online note that hundreds of fans, some dressed as wizards, gathered at bookstores early Wednesday morning to get their hands on the long-awaited translation of the seventh book. The division of online retailer Amazon.com in Japan said in the article that “about 95,000” copies of the translated edition of the book were pre-ordered, making it the highest ever for a Harry Potter novel. One fan, who wore a blonde wig and dressed as the character of Luna Lovegood, is also quoted in the article as saying:

“I’m so excited I feel like crying. I’m totally enchanted. I feel sad that this is the end but since I’ve followed him throughout the years I will be seeing him out, and that comforts me.”

As we first reported back in May, the cover art for this edition of the book was released and can be found in our Image Galleries.





32 Responses to Japanese Translation of “Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows” Released

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It’s so cool how kids all over the world enjoy the Harry Potter series like we all do!!! I really feel like Harry Potter is a lot more popular when I hear of this sort of stuff(although I know how big HP is already).

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Oh and…first!

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ooh… good for them!!!! enjoy reading!!!!! vive xe

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Oh man, and that French kid got so impatient with the slow pace after a few {what weeks? months?} that he did it himself, the Japanese look like saints compared to that. But I must admit that I like the French kids style, you can’t do it in a reasonable time frame? Get out of my way and let me show you how lol

John B.

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But how bummed where they though to know that so many people in other countries all ready know what happens in the last book…. and they had to wait a year… stinks…

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OMG! that late!? DH was released one year ago. why are they so slow in Japan? poor fans. but this is a great time for them,while we’re waiting for the trailer…. zzzzzzzzzzzzzzz….

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OMG how is it that late, we had it a year ago, ow well better late than never i think its great that kids all over the world are having a chanse to read it :):):):):):):):):)):):):):):):)

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to answer your question matea (though you might have just said it rhetorically!) i hear the reason that the japanese versions take so long to get translated is because the lady who works the translations takes extra special time and care to make sure the japanese version is as faithful to jk rowling’s original prose as possible. she even takes time to make sure jo’s delightful puns and plays on words are not lost in translation. definitely the book is worth the wait for loyal japanese hp fans :)

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Um…do they say Harry or do they translate it to Japanese? And if so, whats Harry in japanese :)

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How delightful to hear of such careful dedication to the style of J.K. Rowling on the part of the translator. I admire her tremendously and I would imagine the fans do too.

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How wonderful, it’s great to hear that there are still excited fans out there in the world. We love you, Jo!*

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Um…do they say Harry or do they translate it to Japanese? And if so, whats Harry in japanese :) The katagana script on the cover reads HA.RI.i – PO.TSU.TA.a, so it could be Hari Potta, but Japanese don’t distuighish much between “l” and “r”. I take it that the majority of Japanese is far better in Engleish then I am in Japanese, so many know the last book already and did not wait a year for it.

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What scene is the cover? It looks….different…

But OMG! How late! Those poor people! I hope some of them got copies from the states or somewhere else and didn’t have to wait for so long!

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Oh, what I wouldn’t give to be able to go through all of those feelings again. I miss that feeling of waiting for the next HP novel to come out. Those were the good ol’ days…

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I`d go absolutely insane if I had to wait one year after almost everyone else… Good for them though. :)

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thats cool… i wish i was reading it for the first time…that was a fun time, one year ago that was.

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The Japanese have been among the most dedicated and loyal of all Potter fans in non-English speaking countries. They just love it. Many are powerfully transcendental or religious in their outlook on life, and I suspect they will just love the ending.

I don’t know how they pronounce “Harry” but I know that in Russian the English H is rendered as G, so instead of Harry Potter he becomes Gary Potter! (although it’s pronounced Gah-ree)

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Actually, his name is written ‘Harii Pottaa’ (ハリー・ポッター) so it sounds almost exactly the same.

I work in Japanese schools, and most of my kids seem to be film-only fans. From a conversation I had with some of them though, I gather most of the character names are the same. Although they did have a bif of trouble working out who I meant by ‘Lupin’, so maybe that’s pronounced differently.

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Wow, I can’t believe they had to wait that long. I don’t think the Chinese version is out yet in Hong Kong but even though if it came I wouldn’t read it it because it would take so long to read because my English is better than my Chinese but Chinese is my mother’s tongue. I don’t think the Japanese waited that long they probably already read the English if they were big fans of HP

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Greetings from Aichi ken in Japan! The release party was awesome! It was nice to see all of the excellent costumes and talk to them about how they passes the wait for th last book. Some of them had the UK edition with them, but had lots of trouble reading it. They gave out some nice blue bags with the two volume book 7. Has a little drawing of what I believe is Mr. Weasley’s patronus.

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Anyone know how much later Japan gets the HP movies? I don’t want to wait ages to see HBP…!

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considering Japanese fans are such mega HP fans, I’m surprised it took so long to get a translation.

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It’s just absolutely fantastic!,how the whole world read Harry Potter,I think that the Harry Potter fandom is the greatest

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I am not so sure the Japanese would have read the English version by now, looking at how many are excited celebrating this translated release and good for them. But what I am curious about is wouldn’t most of them know how it ends by now purely by leaked word of mouth? Its one year now and even Jo Rowling leaks the ending.

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well, I’m Japanese and I live in Japan at the moment. And I am disappointed with the Japanese translation.

THE JAPANESE TRANSLATION OF HARRY POTTER IS BAD. The woman who does the translation isn’t a professional writer but just a simultaneous interpretor. So the translation is actually FULL OF ERRORS and the language doesn’t even sound like natural Japanese…

I suppose the reason why it takes over a year for the japanese translation to be published is because this translator has to “take extra special time and care to make sure” that her translation doesn’t come out as bad as it is likely to. (which unfortunately has been unavoidable) ... : (

The problem here is that, many people who read this Japanese translation of HP end up not liking the book that much, all because of the weird language use. Many Japanese people totally misunderstand HP simply BECAUSE THE TRANSLATION IS SO BAD.

Well, I wish that more people abroad including J.K.Rowling will become more aware of this serious problem so that a better translation may be published in the future.

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I work in Japanese schools, and most of my kids seem to be film-only fans. From a conversation I had with some of them though, I gather most of the character names are the same. Although they did have a bif of trouble working out who I meant by ‘Lupin’, so maybe that’s pronounced differently.

Hey, where do you work? I work in Ohmiya and Shimokitazawa (Tokyo). Actually, we have the books at my school, and the kids read them obsessively. We’ve had to settle arguments with rock-paper-scissors over who gets to read during their waiting time.

But yes. I scanned some of the texts out of curiosity, and though I can’t read a great deal of it, I can tell you that ALL of the character names are the same, and the names of places and items that have been changed have been done so with good reason.

One other reason it may take so long to get out the Japanese version is because there are both adult and children’s versions—the children’s versions have furigana (small, phonetic pronunciations) over the kanji so that every reading level can enjoy them. _

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The British Board of Film Classification made an update yesterday about a combined IMAX Half-Blood Prince and Watchmen teaser trailer.

It is classified as a 12A and the running time is listed as 2 minutes 40 seconds. Considering this features two films, it is likely they will each be around a minute and 20 seconds long, as is normal for a teaser.

We will attempt to find out when this particular trailer will be running.

Source: Harry Potter forever via SnitchSeeker

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Looks like someone didn’t close their italic tag…

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I actually disagree with S’harry. The Japanese version doesn’t sound unnatural at all. Of course, no translations are perfect but I think even the most nitpicky HP purist would agree that the translator, whose name is Yuko Matsuoka, is rather ingenious in the way she preserves JK Rowling’s writing when converting it into another language. I know most here don’t have access to the Japanese version to compare, but there is an awesome website that highlights comparisons (also, the Chinese and Vietnamese versions too!) Check it out: http://www.cjvlang.com/Hpotter/ Plus, most translators usually aren’t professional writers… they’re hired to translate novels, documents, etc. and that’s simply what their job is. And if nothing else, Matsuoka is said to have been approved by JK Rowling herself! (http://www.japantimes.co.jp/cgi-bin/getarticle.pl5?fl20040104a1.htm) I don’t think Jo would let even foreign translators ruin her books… we know her :)

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there, fixed that :P

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“I don’t think the Japanese waited that long they probably already read the English if they were big fans of HP”

It’s not that simple. English is very different from Japanese. The English version may have been available, but that doesn’t mean fans are able to read it. I understand that frustration very well. When I started reading Harry Potter series, I read them in Japanese. I found the next book(after the ones I read in Japanese) but only in English, which I didn’t know at that time. I even tried translating the first paragraph of the book word by word using dictionary, but since the sentence structure is different, it made no sense. So you can’t simply say that that big fans of HP should just read it in English.

And I agree with darling; I don’t find the Japanese translation bad at all (at least for the first three books). Sure, it does lose some of the original charm of the story written in English, but that happens with any translation.

I wish I could get a copy but I’m too far away now :P I can’t help but wonder how the [tear-jerking] forest scene was translated

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well, I’m rather surprised to find opinions saying that the Japanese translation is good. : (

I know this wouldn’t make much sense to people who don’t know Japanese but the translator often uses words that sound like they belong to 17th century Japan. And I would say that that has ruined the “Englishness” in HP a great deal.

She makes Voldemort sound like he’s a 10year old bully in the playground, by having him refer to himself using a rather childish pronoun. (In Japan there are variations of pronouns, not just “I” or “we.”)

In addition to that I have read an article where a professional writer has said that Matsuoka (the Japanese translator)’s translation of Harry Potter is seen rather as a joke among a lot of us.

I understand that there are HP readers of many levels, but as a person who is fluent in both English and Japanese I would have to say that the translation is poor.

And just to add up, J.K.Rowling HAS indeed approved of the translator, but the fact is that she herself cannot actually read Japanese. So even if the translation was bad she wouldn’t be aware of that. :P

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