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What will J.K. Rowling's Next Book Be About?

Posted by Melissa
May 25, 2011, 11:40 AM
A political faerie story, like she once said. Tiny little faeries running for office.
5837 (15%)
The Scottish Book. All about Scotland.
3253 (8%)
Albus Severus and the Book They Said Would Never Happen
20767 (54%)
I'm J.K. Rowling, and I'll tell you in comments.
8206 (21%)
  38063 votes in total

13895 Comments

100gundlach_s_hawk_thumb
245 Points

My daughter spent the night with her friend last night. So, my DS and I went to dinner at the bistro at the nice, independent bookstore. He had tomato blue cheese soup to start and I had homemade mushroom soup which were both served with homemade rolls. My DS had Chicken Piccata with Rosemary Polenta. I had Shrimp and Grits. Mine was delicious but it was so rich I had to bring over half of it home. The cheese grits were topped with beautiful large shrimp and steamed asparagus spears. There was a gravy/sauce that was slightly green and quite yummy. I just don’t know what it was. My DS’s chicken and polenta had green olives and artichokes in it.

We had to stop for necessities at the grocery on the way home. We needed eggs, milk and bread for the weekend. By the time we arrived home we collapsed in bed at about 11 PM. Neither of us surfaced this morning until after 9 AM.

Posted by Lady Hawke on August 24, 2013, 11:03 AM report to moderator
Hedwig_avatar_thumb
923 Points

Lady Hawke Isn’t it delightful to have a night off and eat a delicious meal that someone else has cooked? I will now have to look up what you ate because none of it is familiar to me.

Posted by Graymayne on August 24, 2013, 02:21 PM report to moderator
100gundlach_s_hawk_thumb
245 Points

GRAYMAYNE, I have sent you photos of the food. The waiter laughed when he saw me taking photos of our main courses. He said I was the second person photographing the food last night. I told him I had a friend in England who regularly photographed food but that I rarely went to the type of restaurant that had food worthy of photography.

My daughter has arrived home from her “sleep over”. They didn’t go to bed until 4 AM and woke up at 9 AM to go to a Farmer’s Market in our county seat at our court square. They took her to lunch at a restaurant there before bringing her home to us. She is off to bed.

Posted by Lady Hawke on August 24, 2013, 02:51 PM report to moderator
Asti_thumb
106 Points

Good evening!

I have just worked what might just be my last ever Saturday! I have (yet another) new Manager, who has asked if I will change my hours. I’ll soon be working 7 ‘til 4, Monday to Thursday. Exactly the same amount of hours, so I’ll still be able to pick up overtime, but WOW, it’ll be great to lose the Saturdays.

Lady Hawke, how nice to have a date night. I hope you both enjoyed it. I will have similarly exhausted children tomorrow…… They’re both sleeping in the tent tonight.

Posted by asti on August 24, 2013, 03:31 PM report to moderator
100gundlach_s_hawk_thumb
245 Points

ASTI, that is great about lovely three day weekends. I take it your children will be on their own to get themselves to and from school. Isn’t it lucky this change in hours was made when they were old enough to fend for themselves in terms of getting themselves there and back? Will your son still be going to school in the same location, just without uniforms? Did all his friends move on to 6th Form or did he lose some to the testing?

Posted by Lady Hawke on August 24, 2013, 03:44 PM report to moderator
Asti_thumb
106 Points

Lady Hawke, I’ve started at 7am for a long time now. Up until recently, my DS has been around in the mornings to supervise breakfast and take daughter to school. His new job means daughter walks herself in, and yes, it is a relief that she is old enough not to have to worry too much about it.
But yes, the last few years have been easier, as daughter grows up and son is old enough to supervise her.
The 6th Form is in the same location. Some have chosen to take their A Levels at the nearby college, and those who don’t wish to take A Levels, have lots of other options for training at college. I think most of his core group of friends are staying at the school.

Posted by asti on August 24, 2013, 04:55 PM report to moderator
100gundlach_s_hawk_thumb
245 Points

Only since becoming a member of this group and being exposed to the Brits and the HARRIETT in her country did I realize we don’t use the word college in the same way in the US as you do.

I acquired my “university” degree from a college which chose to rename itself a university after I graduated. In the US colleges are usually smaller private schools where you earn a bachelor’s degree. Sometimes, in order to sound larger and more “grown up”, a college will begin to offer one or two master’s degrees in order to call itself a university. Almost all our local colleges have renamed themselves as universities in the last twenty years. My college had a student body of about 750 students before and after changing its name to a university.

My masters degree did come from a full fledged university with tens of thousands of students attending many “colleges”/departments within that university.

I have come to understand through this group a college in other parts of the world is more equivalent to our high schools, the place you attend before you qualify to start your university education.

Posted by Lady Hawke on August 24, 2013, 05:49 PM report to moderator
100gundlach_s_hawk_thumb
245 Points

I found this definition on Wikipedia and I think it confirms what I have come to suspect about our various usages of the word.

In the United States, “college” formally refers to a constituent part of a university, although in Ireland and in some cases in the US, “college” and “university” are interchangeable,1 whereas in Ireland, the UK, New Zealand, Australia, Canada and other former and present Commonwealth nations, “college” may refer to a secondary or high school, a college of further education, a training institution that awards trade qualifications, or a constituent part of a university.

Posted by Lady Hawke on August 24, 2013, 05:51 PM report to moderator
Asti_thumb
106 Points

Here, a college is a place of higher education, (16plus) whereas a University is where you go to take a degree. (At 18+ after A Levels.) It all gets very complicated, as you can take some degree courses at a college….. I suppose the easiest way to describe the difference is that Universities only offer degrees, or above. And yes, especially the older Universities lke Oxford and Cambridge still use the term “college” as sub section of the whole.
Traditional Further Education would be A Levels and a degree. Colleges offer all sorts if other options, training in trades for which you receice a qualification. Without wanting to sound snobbish or elitest, but just trying to explain the difference, a college education and qualification would be the second teir to a University education and a degree. If you wanted to be a hairdresser, or an electrician, for example, you would study at a college, without needing to go to Uni.

Posted by asti on August 24, 2013, 06:40 PM report to moderator
100gundlach_s_hawk_thumb
245 Points

Here we would call it a School of Cosmetology or Engineering.

You don’t attend a college or university here for a trade school type of degree.

It took me a couple of years here to stop using the term college when I was posting something about the time during which I was studying for my first degree. I felt strange calling the school I attended a university when it had not renamed itself at the time I attended but I realized I was making it sound as if I was in trade school or what we call high school (14 -18 years). Students here are required to attend formal academic education institutions until they are 16 although almost all states allow you to continue attending school until you reach 21 if it takes longer than age 18 to graduate. Anyone who stops attending a school of formal academic education at 16 without graduating at approximately 18 years old is said to have “dropped out”.

Many people who drop out do go on to trade schools.

I’m so glad your son did well and is going on with his formal education. I’m so glad he was not forced to “drop out”.

Posted by Lady Hawke on August 24, 2013, 07:00 PM report to moderator
Raven_avatar_thumb
80426 Points

Most of my Leaky friends attending High School in Canada go to ‘Collegiate Institutes’…

Posted by Won_Two on August 25, 2013, 01:28 AM report to moderator
Hedwig_avatar_thumb
923 Points

Lady Hawke Just to muddy the waters a little I have to clarify the situation back in the l950’s in Britain. Children were tested at 11yrs of age by the 11+ examination; those that failed it went to senior schools which included practical skills and a less academic syllabus. Those that passed were sent to senior schools of varying levels denoted by their name, “high school”, “grammar school” or “intermediate”. Parents were asked to state any school preferences before their children took the exam and mine chose the local “intermediate” school which my older sister had attended during WW2. In both cases we could have attended a school with a higher academic level but my parents wanted my sister to be as close to home as possible because our city, being a steel producer, was subject to bombing raids, but our house was safely in suburbs away from the main industrial area. I followed my sister’s route because my father wished to be even-handed in the matter of our education, so we both lost the opportunity of learning two foreign languages and physics and chemistry. The only difference in our education was beyond our control because the school leaving age was fifteen for my sister but, eight years later, the age had been raised to sixteen and the examination system had been changed. I took nine “O” levels (ungraded) and failed only one, Music, along with everyone else who took the subject. At no time was the possibility of attending university discussed in our household but both of us attended a “Commercial College” to learn business skills such as typing, shorthand, book-keeping etc. Friends of mine from junior school who went to grammar schools stayed on to the age of eighteen and took “A levels” and then went on to university. Leaving school at sixteen was considered normal, not “dropping out”. Looking back I am quite thankful that I missed the “sea-change” of opinion, that a university education should be available to all, but I think my sister would have thrived on it. After working as a shorthand-typist for a year she applied to join the WRNS and served for three years as a telegraphist.

Posted by Graymayne on August 25, 2013, 05:19 AM report to moderator
100gundlach_s_hawk_thumb
245 Points

GRAYMAYNE, my goodness that was complicated. What did going to a high school mean in the 1950s? What were the ramifications? If grammar school allowed you to stay on until 18 and take A levels what did going to high school do?

It has been explained to me that one of the reasons the US consistently scores well behind the rest of the world on academic testing is that we do keep almost everyone in the academic mix at least until 18 years old, and some up to 21 years old, including the people who are never ever going to college. A teacher friend of mine who teaches in a special education classroom of students up to 21 years of age whose diapers she must change also has to administer standardized state testing to these young adults who can’t communicate or hold a pencil. She has to present them with each question and mark each one unanswered. Their test results are averaged in with the test results of the children in regular classes and pull down the average grades of everyone. The test results of those who stay on to graduate, knowing they never intend to or qualify to attend university, are averaged in and reported internationally. So, our comparative academic testing reflects the entire student population, including those in special education classrooms and those not on a university preparatory track.

My daughter and I are off to lunch and to see Les Miserables with her friend and her friend’s mother. It is a “girl’s day out” for me, something that almost never happens unless my friend is in town. AND MY FRIEND IS IN TOWN. So, tomorrow I will have a second “girl’s day out”. I’m sure to be very tired by tomorrow night.

Posted by Lady Hawke on August 25, 2013, 11:00 AM report to moderator
Hedwig_avatar_thumb
923 Points

Lady Hawke I have to presume that the “high schools” simply took the pupils with the highest marks, employed highly qualified teachers, and worked to produce students who would achieve the highest grades and go on to Oxford and Cambridge or wherever else they desired to study. Imagine the mental stimulus for these highly intelligent children to be surrounded by others of like mind, and all of them keen to learn and achieve. I remember disapproving strongly when the government of the day changed the whole system and turned all the senior (11- 18yrs) schools into “comprehensive” schools whose intake consisted of those who lived nearby, and abolished the 11+ examinations. I considered it to be a perfect way of trying to fit square pegs into round holes. There was enough parental support from wealthier families to enable some of the high achieving schools to turn private and become fee-paying day schools, but I have no idea of the scale of this rebellion. We now have a situation where spelling is poor, grammar disregarded, some pupils barely able to read and employers disatisfied with the poor standards of job applicants. It is a cause for despair for us of an older generation.

Posted by Graymayne on August 25, 2013, 11:57 AM report to moderator
Asti_thumb
106 Points

Good evening!

We went blackberrying today. There was plenty of evidence of our recent hot weather; lots of dry, scorched bushed with shrivelled, tiny berries, but we found a pretty good haul in the shady woods. Daughter made them into a crumble, with help from her Dad in preparing the apples.

We saw an odd animal in the woods. It was very probably just a cat, but a very ENORMOUS one. I thought at first it was a fox, but the tail was certainly more cat than fox. We also saw an owl fly out in front of us. I don’t know what kind, but it had a huge wingspan.

Posted by asti on August 25, 2013, 03:17 PM report to moderator
55aa6d05ddd08ec391a698f025992b9f_thumb
231 Points

Asti: Was there a large Castle type school building near where you saw the strange animal and bird?

Off to watch sports for a bit.

Posted by ironsos on August 25, 2013, 04:02 PM report to moderator
Asti_thumb
106 Points

I was on the lookout, believe me! The thought of animagi did certainly cross my mind.

Posted by asti on August 25, 2013, 04:12 PM report to moderator
100gundlach_s_hawk_thumb
245 Points

ASTI, that was quite an interesting walk you had. I’ve heard owls in the wild but I’ve never seen one. What sorts of largish wild cat do you have in your area? Blackberry season tends to be in very hot weather around here. I’m really surprised you have had enough heat to ripen blackberries.

Les Miserables was quite good, especially for a regional production. Everyone enjoyed it, even those who don’t normally attend theatre productions.

Unfortunately, both my DS and daughter have awaken sick this morning. My DS almost stayed home but decided to press on to work but I won’t be surprised to see him back at home early. They are both blowing, coughing and have some gastrointestinal issues. My daughter’s voice is gone and her cough is down in her chest. If my DS’s cough moves down into his chest he will be home.

Posted by Lady Hawke on August 26, 2013, 08:51 AM report to moderator
316009_2243430401868_1131350579_2590501_6687089_n_thumb
248 Points

Was not impressed with the City Of Bones movie. If i can distance it from the book, I will be able to agree that the changes they made – make for a good movie. However, it may be a while before i can god t

Posted by korey1979 on August 26, 2013, 09:12 AM report to moderator
100gundlach_s_hawk_thumb
245 Points

KOREY, I’m so sorry to hear that about City of Bones. We had so much to do this weekend we didn’t make it to the movie. My daughter was determined, was even trying to get us to go last night. She is going to be so frustrated with a lot of changes.

Posted by Lady Hawke on August 26, 2013, 09:22 AM report to moderator
316009_2243430401868_1131350579_2590501_6687089_n_thumb
248 Points

My son liked it – even though in his words “it is nothing like the book”…

I really don’t mind changes when they’re done for translation from book to movie – like with President Snow’s dialogue in Hunger Games. But this felt like they made changes just because they could.

Posted by korey1979 on August 26, 2013, 09:55 AM report to moderator
316009_2243430401868_1131350579_2590501_6687089_n_thumb
248 Points

However I was please to learn that the theater I saw it in has big leather seats that rock slightly with lots of leg room. This is only one of two theaters that has this available in my state. I’ll be trying to see more movies in there – that’s for sure. So at least I got to be angry in comfort.

Posted by korey1979 on August 26, 2013, 09:59 AM report to moderator
100gundlach_s_hawk_thumb
245 Points

I thought most of the changes in THE HUNGER GAMES were helpful. I liked hearing President Snow’s thought process, why he was reacting the way he was reacting. So, I don’t mind changes that help clarify or enhance what happened in the book. I don’t like it when they go completely off track and basically write a new plot with similar characters who have the names of the people in the book

THE BOURNE IDENTITY movies are pretty decent movies BUT they essentially use a character similar to but not the same as the one in the books and took most of the plot and dropped it in the trash, except for the running and screaming parts. They left a lot of action without much in the way of explanation or character development. There was a made for TV Richard Chamberlain version from back in the 80s. It didn’t have nearly as many road chases, explosions or physical battles but it was almost identical to the book. The character and plot were intact.

Posted by Lady Hawke on August 26, 2013, 01:27 PM report to moderator
55aa6d05ddd08ec391a698f025992b9f_thumb
231 Points

http://www.gocomics.com/theargylesweater.

Benn a long time since I laughed so hard.

Posted by ironsos on August 26, 2013, 01:49 PM report to moderator
55aa6d05ddd08ec391a698f025992b9f_thumb
231 Points

Benn a long time since I knew how to spell.

Posted by ironsos on August 26, 2013, 02:19 PM report to moderator
Asti_thumb
106 Points

Good evening!

I worked 7 ‘til 4 tonight, finishing an hour earlier. Wow, it makes a HUGE difference. I think I’m going to like my new hours.

Lady Hawke, we have no native wildcats in England. I think there is a very rare Scottish wildcat, but none here. There are semi regular rumours about sightings of big cats, possibly released exotic pets, but nothing has ever been proven. What we saw was pretty certainly a very large domestic moggy, with fox like features.
I hope your daughter and DS don’t feel too rough……and I hope you stay well!

Korey, I’m so glad you got to be angry in comfort! Our local cinema was refurbished a few years ago, and while the seats don’t rock, the experience is now far more like sitting on your own sofa, and it makes a LOT of difference.

Posted by asti on August 26, 2013, 03:47 PM report to moderator
100gundlach_s_hawk_thumb
245 Points

We have one theatre that has two large chairs with a small table between the chairs. Then there is a space and there is another unit of two chairs with a table. You couldn’t stretch your leg out and touch the seat in front of you if you tried. It feels quite luxurious to see a movie there.

I did see my friend today for awhile. After taking my daughter to the doctor who wrote prescriptions for her and her father I brought her home and she went to bed with her cell phone. My friend drove over to me and we had lunch at a restaurant about three minutes from my house and went to the local bookstore where I purchased a book for my daughter. So, she was ill and stayed at home alone for the afternoon but she has a book that she was pleased to see. Thank goodness for a child who can stay at home for a bit, even when under the weather.

Now, I have to get myself busy and go and produce something that can be eaten for dinner.

Posted by Lady Hawke on August 26, 2013, 06:19 PM report to moderator
55aa6d05ddd08ec391a698f025992b9f_thumb
231 Points

Asti: I wonder if this is what you saw.

http://www.google.com/search?sourceid=navclient&aq=&oq=savan&ie=UTF-8&rlz=1T4GGNI_enUS536US536&q=savannah+cat&gs_l=hp..0.0l4.0.0.0.7598………..0.hd_Fn62qFSA&pbx=1

Posted by ironsos on August 27, 2013, 12:33 PM report to moderator
55aa6d05ddd08ec391a698f025992b9f_thumb
231 Points

Do not know if link will work. In case not look up Savannah cat.

Posted by ironsos on August 27, 2013, 12:34 PM report to moderator
55aa6d05ddd08ec391a698f025992b9f_thumb
231 Points

Tech support is my favorite

http://theberry.com/2013/08/27/what-i-really-do-16-photos/

Posted by ironsos on August 27, 2013, 01:18 PM report to moderator
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