His Own Worst Enemy: Harry as a Horcrux
 

By ~Mokey
 

"Unless I'm much mistaken, he transferred some of his own powers to you the night he gave you that scar, Not something he intended to do, I'm sure..."

"Voldemort put a bit of himself in me?" Harry said, thunderstruck.

"It certainly seems so." 1

Well, that pretty much clears it up for me. Dumbledore thinks Voldemort put a bit of himself into Harry. This tells me that Harry is a Horcrux and an unintentional one at that. Although this clears it up for me, however, there are many legitimate questions that those, who do not agree with this theory, pose. A few that come to mind are "Are you nuts, where's your proof?!" "You can't make a Horcrux by accident, so how is it possible to make an unintentional Horcrux?" Possibly, the most significant of these questions is, "If Harry is a Horcrux he has to destroy himself. How can he do that and be alive to kill Voldemort?" In this essay I will attempt to answer each of these questions in turn, provide evidence that Harry is a Horcrux, and with a little speculation, try to reconstruct the events that resulted in his becoming one.

Are you nuts, where's your proof?!

In regards to that first part, yes as a matter of fact I'm mad as a hatter, thank you very much. As to the second part of the question I cannot claim to have proof; otherwise the Harrycrux debate would not exist. I can, however, explore what I believe to be strong evidence.

The Proof (er, evidence) is in the Prophecy:

...AND EITHER MUST DIE AT THE HAND OF THE OTHER FOR NEITHER CAN
LIVE WHILE THE OTHER SURVIVES...
2

This part of the prophecy bothered me from the first time I read it. If neither can live while the other survives, how can both Harry and Voldemort exist simultaneously since the graveyard scene in Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire? At first I thought perhaps I was taking it too literally, but then I read the following quote from Jo: "Both Madam Trelawney and I worded the prophecy extremely carefully and that is all I have to say on the subject!" 3 If the prophecy is worded so carefully then how can such a contradiction exist unless it is a clue? Perhaps Jo is telling us that we need to look at this prophecy more carefully. Perhaps the two are simultaneously existing, but not simultaneously living. Apparently there is some confusion as to what "living" actually means, where Voldemort is concerned:

"Yes, alive' said Fudge. "That is - I don't know - is a man alive if he can't be killed? I don't understand it, and Dumbledore won't explain properly - but anyway, he's certainly got a body and is walking and talking and killing, so I suppose, for the purposes of our discussion, yes, he's alive." 4

I find it interesting that Fudge is unclear as to whether or not Voldemort is alive, and it seems as though Dumbledore has added to his confusion. Perhaps Fudge is right; maybe a person is not truly alive if he cannot be killed. This would mean that Voldemort cannot truly live until he is mortal. If Harry is a Horcrux, then Harry is keeping Voldemort immortal just by being alive. Therefore, Voldemort cannot live (truly live) while Harry survives.

But what about Harry? Why can't he live if Voldemort survives? Let's look at the first part of the prophecy:

THE ONE WITH THE POWER TO VANQUISH THE DARK LORD APPROACHES...BORN TO THOSE WHO HAVE THRICE DEFIED HIM, BORN AS THE SEVENTH MONTH DIES...AND THE DARK LORD WILL MARK HIM AS HIS EQUAL, BUT HE WILL HAVE THE POWER THE DARK LORD KNOWS NOT.5

So, "Neither can live while the other survives' refers to Voldemort and the one who fits the above criteria. However, if Harry is a Horcrux, we can conclude that he is not really living as the boy he was when he fit these criteria. Harry cannot truly live as Harry Potter if he is part Voldemort. Therefore Harry cannot live while Voldemort survives. Of course, if this logic is correct, one could say that Harry could live if he could destroy the Horcrux that lies within him without killing Voldemort. I believe, though, that Harry will have to destroy the part of Voldemort that lies within himself last, because destroying it could possibly lead to Harry's demise. So in order to kill Voldemort, he must destroy all of the other Horcruxes first. I believe (as I will explain later in this essay) that Voldemort will die upon the destruction of all the Horcruxes.

The conflict within: Harry's inner monologues

Like many perfectly sane people Harry talks to himself sometimes. However, unlike most of them, many times he answers back. Okay, I'm not insinuating Harry is insane, but I am insinuating that perhaps one of those voices isn't Harry. During Harry's inner monologues, he usually uses one of two ways of addressing himself, sometimes he has an inner dialogue and uses both. I'll be referring to Harry's two ways of talking to himself as "first person thoughts", where he expresses himself using the first person; and "second person thoughts' where he addresses himself using the second person. In cases where the second person thoughts present themselves, the voice seems a little less benign, whereas the first person thoughts appear more benign and often-times noble.6 We know that the fragments of souls within Horcruxes are capable of being sentient;7 this makes it entirely possible that the second person thoughts are Voldemort's nature speaking to Harry. The second person thoughts could be the Horcrux's thoughts. Let's consider the following examples:

"But I'm in Gryffindor' Harry thought. "The Sorting Hat wouldn't have put me in here if I had Slytherin blood...."

"Ah' said a nasty little voice in his brain, "but the Sorting Hat wanted to put you in Slytherin, don't you remember?" 8

It could have been easy to write both sides of this argument in first person or second person alone, but this argument is written from both perspectives. And, interestingly enough, it is the second person thoughts that not only give Harry doubts, but also express an interest in Slytherin.

Okay, so maybe one little inner dialogue doesn't mean anything, so let's look at another instance. When Harry confronts Sirius for the first time, he is consumed with rage and wants to see Black dead.9 Harry hesitates, instead of killing Black right away. Yet, a voice within him speaks: "Harry gripped his wand convulsively - ˜Do it now!' said a voice in his head." 10 Here, again, we see the second person thoughts being less than benign. The second person thoughts are actually egging Harry on to commit murder.

However, this isn't the only suspicious thing about the incident in the Shrieking Shack:

A boiling hate erupted in Harry's chest, leaving no place for fear. For the first time in his life, he wanted his wand back in his hand, not to defend himself, but to attack...to kill.11

His thin chest rose and fell rapidly as he watched Harry walking slowly nearer, his wand pointing straight at Black's heart.12

For some time I wondered what Harry would have done to kill Sirius if he hadn't hesitated, because he does not know of the Avada Kedavra curse yet.13 But from the above quotes we see that he almost instinctively fills two of the requirements for Unforgivable curses. He is not merely feeling "righteous anger' but has a "want" to kill.14 Also, he is pointing his wand at Black's chest and, as we have seen, this is where the Avada Kedavra curse is traditionally aimed. If Harry had not lost his resolve, how would he have killed Sirius? He really seemed prepared to kill Sirius, and he almost seemed to know what he was doing, without thinking about it. Would the bit of Voldemort's soul within him have known what to do?

Another interesting point about the encounter at the Shrieking Shack is that, while ready to kill Black from the beginning of the encounter, he does not feel the same compulsion to kill Wormtail, who is Voldemort's servant. He thinks much more clearly when it comes to Wormtail, and there are no second person thoughts trying to persuade him to kill Peter Pettigrew.15

Let's look at one more instance of a conversation that Harry has with himself. Here Harry is feeling jealous that Ron received a Prefect's badge and not him16:

"Not all the time, though' Harry argued with himself. "They didn't fight Quirrell with me. They didn't take on Riddle and the basilisk. They didn't get rid of all those dementors the night Sirius escaped. They weren't in that graveyard with me, the night Voldemort returned..."

And the same feeling of ill usage that had overwhelmed him on the night he had arrived rose again. "I've definitely done more' Harry thought indignantly. I've done more than either of them!"

"But maybe' said the small voice fairly, "maybe Dumbledore doesn't choose prefects because they've got themselves into a load of dangerous situations...Maybe he chooses them for other reasons....Ron must have something you don't..." 17

I find this an interesting passage, because Harry's first person voice is not exactly being noble. In fact, he seems to be your average angst-ridden teenager. The interesting thing here, however, is that when Harry begins to reach a mature, "fair" conclusion (with his first person thoughts) the second person thought pops in and pulls him back. It makes him doubt himself again. Another reason I find this passage fascinating is that the last line could have easily been written, "Ron must have something I don't." It seems that the second person thought was deliberately added.18

Voldemort: Possession and Protection

The question, "Why would Voldemort have tried so many times to kill Harry, if Harry is a Horcrux?" 19 is another valid point in the "Harry is not a Horcrux" argument. The way I see it, the Dark Lord did not know that Harry was a Horcrux until Voldemort tried to possess him in Harry Potter and the Order of the Phoenix. We see in the graveyard scene in Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire that Voldemort is not averse to killing Harry at that time.20 In the Ministry of Magic, the Death Eaters appear to have orders to attack Harry after they secure the prophecy,21 and Voldemort himself tries to kill Harry in the Ministry.22 This all stops, however, after the Dark Lord tries to possess Harry. When Voldemort possesses Harry he tries to get Dumbledore to kill Harry, however, after a few seconds Voldemort flees Harry's body.23 Dumbledore tells Harry that this is because of Harry's ability to love: "He could not bear to reside in a body so full of the force he detests." 24

I, however, do not think that this is the full reason. I'm not even sure that Dumbledore is correct in this particular guess. Voldemort has Harry's blood in his own body-- blood that is full of love.25 Voldemort has had no problem inhabiting that body thus far. I think the main reason that Voldemort could not possess Harry is the mere fact that there wasn't enough room in the host, so to speak. It is also highly possible that Voldemort, after being directly inside Harry and finding that a piece of himself was contained within, gave up his quest to try to get Dumbledore to kill Harry. He realized that if Dumbledore killed Harry, he would also be killing a piece of Voldemort himself.

We see in Harry Potter and the Half Blood Prince that the Death Eaters no longer have orders to kill Harry. When the Death Eaters go after Harry, Snape declares, "Have you forgotten our orders? Potter belongs to the Dark Lord - we are to leave him! Go! Go!" 26 If Harry is a Horcrux, there are two good reasons behind this. The first is that Voldemort now knows that Harry is a Horcrux and wants him alive, so that he can somehow safely remove that part of his soul without damaging it. The second reason is that Horcruxes are hard to destroy. Dumbledore nearly lost a hand destroying one.27 Voldemort knows that it would be highly dangerous for his Death Eaters to try to destroy a Horcrux, especially considering the fact that they, most likely, do not know that he is a Horcrux.

Some might say that Voldemort wants to kill Harry himself, with no help, as in the Graveyard Scene in Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire. I don't think this is the case, however, because as I mentioned above the Death Eaters seem to have orders to attack Harry in the Ministry of Magic, in Harry Potter and the Order of the Phoenix. In Harry Potter and the Half-Blood Prince, He doesn't even want his Death Eaters to touch Harry.

Tom Riddle and Harry Potter: Similar means of obtaining information

There are many similarities between Harry Potter and Tom Riddle; however, these similarities have been discussed at length in the Harrycrux debate, so I won't list all of them here. There is, however, one similarity I feel that I must include here, and it is has to do with how Harry and Tom obtain their information. I feel that this is important because obtaining information is something that requires not only charm, but a bit of manipulation, and we know that these are some of Tom Riddle's strong points.

Let's look at the similarity between these two quotes, from Hagrid and Slughorn respectively. In Harry Potter and the Order of the Phoenix, Hagrid says "Never known kids like you three fer knowin' more'n yeh oughta." 28 In Harry Potter and the Half Blood Prince, Slughorn says to Riddle:

"I must say, I'd like to know where you get your information, boy, more knowledgeable than half the staff, you are."... "What with your uncanny ability to know things you shouldn't, and your careful flattery of the people who matter-..." 29

Although Harry does not go out of his way to flatter the "people who matter' he does have an uncanny ability to know things he shouldn't. These two quotes are so remarkably similar that I cannot believe that it is a coincidence. Is the part of Harry that is Voldemort helping him attain information?

The following is another set of eerily similar quotes, from Tom Riddle and Harry, respectively. In the chapter, "A Sluggish Memory' Tom asks Slughorn what he knows about Horcruxes:

"Sir, I wanted to ask you something."

"Ask away, then, m'boy, ask away...."

"Sir, I wondered what you know about...about Horcruxes?" 30

Later in the chapter, "Birthday Surprises' Harry asks Slughorn the same question, using exactly the same words:

"Sir' said Harry, reminding himself irresistibly of Voldemort, "I wanted to ask you something."

"Ask away then, my dear boy, ask away..."

"Sir, I wondered what you know about...about Horcruxes?" 31

Not only are the quotes from Harry and Riddle identical, but Harry reminds himself irresistibly of Voldemort. He knows he sounds like the most evil wizard in the world, and yet something in him cannot resist imitating Riddle. I find it hard to believe that Harry himself would want to sound anything like Voldemort, therefore, I must conclude that it is the bit of Voldemort's soul in Harry coming through again.

I'd like to explore one more disturbing quote dealing with the means of obtaining information:

It was very well done, thought Harry, the hesitancy, the casual tone, the careful flattery, none of it overdone. He, Harry, had had too much experience of trying to wheedle information out of reluctant people not to recognize a master at work.32

Not only is it odd that Harry is admiring Voldemort's manipulative work, but Harry also identifies with and recognizes the steps Riddle takes to ensure that he gets his information. It's very hard for me to see this coming from the Harry that I know and love. This really seems to be Voldemort speaking through Harry.

You can't make a Horcrux by accident, so how is it possible to make an unintentional Horcrux?

I'd like to present two theories on this. The first is that Voldemort did not intend to make Harry a Horcrux, and, yet, it wasn't an accident. The second is that Voldemort did not intend to make Harry a Horcrux, and it was an accident.

Could Snape be responsible for Harry's being a Horcrux?

You'll forgive me, I hope, for the highly speculative nature of the reconstruction of events that is to follow. As Dumbledore says, "From this point forth, we shall be leaving the firm foundation of fact and journeying together through the murky marshes of memory into thickets of wildest guesswork." 33 I will be stringing together facts from canon to recreate what I believe happened that night at Godric's Hollow, when Harry's parents were so viciously murdered.

We know that Lucius had possession of Tom Riddle's diary,34 and that R.A.B somehow found out about Slytherin's locket.35 We also know that Dumbledore suspects that Voldemort went to Godric's Hollow that fateful Halloween planning to make a Horcrux when he killed Harry.36 It's very possible that the desired object was something in the Potter house, because we know that, according to Dumbledore, Voldemort would have wanted to make a Horcrux out of something that belonged to Godric Gryffindor.37 I do not believe that it is a coincidence that the village where the Potters lived was named after this founder. Based upon these facts, I can conclude that it is a distinct possibility that each Horcrux had a Death Eater guardian, a guardian who did not necessarily know that what he was guarding was a Horcrux. I believe that Snape was to guard the object in Godric's Hollow that Voldemort was going to make a Horcrux. Since Snape knows so much about the Dark Arts,38 it does not take a far leap of logic to gather that Snape had, like R.A.B., figured out what Voldemort was doing.

We know for certain that Wormtail was the Secret Keeper for the Potters.39 We can guess that Voldemort made Wormtail tell Snape the Potters' location so that Snape could keep an eye on the object that Voldemort intended on making a Horcrux. Another thing of which we can be certain is that Voldemort gave Lily a chance to live:

E.S.: This is one of my burning questions since the third book - why did Voldemort offer Lily so many chances to live? Would he actually have let her live?

J.K.R.: Mmhm.

E.S.: Why?

J.K.R.: [silence] Can't tell you.40

But why would he offer Lily so many chances to live? It seems to me that he did it simply because Snape asked him to do it. Snape must have been in the Dark Lord's favor because he relayed the prophecy to Voldemort.41 He also managed to secure a position at Hogwarts just as Voldemort asked him.42 I don't think that Voldemort would deny such a faithful servant such a simple request. I'm not saying here that Snape was in love with Lily; however, Lily seemed to be the only person at Hogwarts to stick up for Snape,43 and I believe that Snape would not have wanted to be the cause of her death.

Now, let's assume that the above is true for the sake of this discussion. When Voldemort went to kill Harry it's possible that Snape could have followed, peeking in windows to make sure that Voldemort didn't kill Lily. However, Voldemort did kill Lily. I can picture Snape outside the window, enraged, but too afraid to go inside and confront the Dark Lord (which would explain why Snape hates to be called "Coward"),44 so Snape did the only thing he could think of doing. He muttered the incantation to make a Horcrux as Voldemort raised his wand to Harry. Thus, Lily's death resulted in her own son becoming a Horcrux, and the Dark Lord vanished.

Snape, I imagine, was none too pleased with Voldemort, but now he had a secret, and leverage, against the Dark Lord, if he ever was to return to power. Snape knew something the Dark Lord didn't; that the boy who brought about his downfall was also harboring a piece of his soul. This would explain Snape's absolute hatred of Harry. He was not only hating and punishing the James in Harry from the start, but he was also hating and punishing the Voldemort in Harry from the start. It would also explain why Snape saved Harry's life in the Harry Potter and the Sorcerer's Stone,45 and why he tried to save it again in Harry Potter and the Prisoner of Azkaban:46 As long as Harry was alive and Snape was the only one who knew Harry was a Horcrux, Snape would have leverage over Voldemort if ever Voldemort came back.

Harry's Occlumency lessons fit in well with this theory. Although Dumbledore gave the order for Snape to give Harry the lessons, I think Snape was glad to have the chance to block Voldemort's access to Harry's mind. Where Snape is concerned the less Voldemort knows about Harry, the better. It's interesting that Snape was hiding memories from Harry in his Pensieve. I don't think he was merely hiding the memory about James. If that were the case, he could have easily fit that memory in a bottle, but Snape has a Pensieve full of memories. I think he was not only hiding these memories from Harry, but also hiding them from Lord Voldemort.

Could Voldemort be responsible for making Harry a Horcrux?

I'll be the first to admit that the above theory may seem a bit of a stretch to some, although I do not think that there is any proof that it is wrong. I would like to offer an alternative theory as to how Harry became a Horcrux...one that may be more easily embraced.

It is entirely possible that the Horcrux in Harry was created by accident. No one knows just how Horcruxes are created ’ for instance, when the incantation is said. It makes sense to me that the incantation could be spoken before the murder. If that is the case then Voldemort could have spoken the incantation before his attempt to murder Harry. After he tried to Avada Kedavra Harry, the curse rebounded and destroyed Voldemort's body.47 So in a sense Voldemort murdered himself that night, and with his own murder he could have made Harry a Horcrux. Now some might say that Voldemort didn't really die, because his spirit and soul hung around. But we know that there is spiritual life after death in the Potterverse, and many ghosts' spirits and souls hang around. It seems that all that is necessary for a death is the death of the earthly body.

Jo tells us that Voldemort's boggart would be "death, ignominious death .... He would see himself dead....He sees death as a "shameful human weakness." 48 How fittingly ironic would it be that in his quest for immortality, he brought about his own demise? He marked Harry as his equal that night, and gave Harry the power to destroy him. "The prophecy (like the one the witches made to Macbeth) becomes the catalyst for a situation that would never have occurred if it had not been made." 49 Voldemort fulfilled the first part of the prophecy by trying to avoid it; just as he set the events in motion that will lead to his death, by trying to find a way around death itself.

"If you are writing about evil, which I am, and if you are writing about someone who's, essentially, a psychopath ’ you have a duty to show the real evil of taking human life." 50

Voldemort is an evil psychopath who will kill anyone who stands in his way. But those who live by the sword die by the sword, and I don't think Jo would have it any other way. Just as Voldemort is blind to the pain he causes to those who stand in the way of his mad quest for immortality; he is also blind to the damage that he has done to himself. In his quest for immortality, he has brought about his own demise, by giving his worst enemy the most powerful weapon he could have, a part of Voldemort's soul itself.

If Harry is a Horcrux he has to destroy himself. How can he do that and be alive to kill Voldemort?

"He said my blood would make him stronger than if he'd used someone else's." Harry told Dumbledore. "He said the protection my - my mother left in me - he'd have it too. And he was right - he could touch me without hurting himself, he touched my face."

For a fleeting instant, Harry thought he saw a gleam of something like triumph in Dumbledore's eyes.51

Interesting. Why would Dumbledore feel triumphant knowing that Voldemort has Harry's protective blood in his veins? The answer, I believe, is what will ultimately destroy Voldemort. Of all the fatal mistakes that Voldemort has made in his obsessive quest for immortality, I believe that taking Harry's blood was the most foolish of them all. It is the blood that runs through Voldemort's veins, Harry's blood, which will enable Harry to be able to destroy Voldemort even if he has to kill himself.

Voldemort, as of Harry Potter and the Half-Blood Prince, has Harry's protection in his blood, but he also has something else in his veins that runs through Harry's, and that is love. As we saw in Harry Potter and the Sorcerer's Stone, Voldemort cannot even bear to come in contact with this powerful force.52 So what is keeping Voldemort alive if there is love in his veins? It is the protection. Unfortunately for Voldemort, Harry's protection runs out when he comes of age,53 and since Harry and Voldemort are so intricately connected, I believe the protection will run out for Voldemort then as well. The love in his blood will weaken him; it will begin to kill him. He will not die though; his Horcruxes will keep him alive, keep him tied to this earth. But once the Horcruxes are destroyed - that's it for Voldemort and he will self-destruct.54 Once the protection has left Voldemort all Harry will have to do is destroy the Horcruxes, and the love in Voldemort's veins will kill him. The last Horcrux that Harry will have to destroy will be himself and that will automatically be the end of Voldemort. Whether Harry will leap through the Veil, or sacrifice himself and get to come back, or be killed in the final battle is outside the scope of this essay. However when the destruction of the last bit of Voldemort in Harry takes place, it will be all that is needed to destroy the Dark Lord.

I have offered, in this essay, what I believe to be sufficient evidence that Harry is a Horcrux, and that Harry can still be a Horcrux and be the one to defeat the Dark Lord. It is important to understand that if Harry is a Horcrux, it is Voldemort's fault that he is so. If Harry does defeat the Dark Lord, it is Voldemort's fault that he will do so. Voldemort has set all of these events into motion through his blind ambition for immortality. We all know that Voldemort is blind to the pain and destruction that he has caused to so many others along the road to immortality. How fitting it is that he has been blind to the pain and destruction that he has brought upon himself. He has created the Harrycrux, which is the tool that will make his greatest fear, and the thing he will stop at nothing to avoid, come to pass...his own death.
Works Cited
1. Rowling, J.K. Harry Potter and the Chamber of Secrets. New York: Scholastic, 1999. p.333.

2. Rowling, J.K. Harry Potter and the Order of the Phoenix. New York: Scholastic, 2003. p.841.

3. Rowling, J.K. "About the Books: What is the significance of Neville being the other boy to whom
the prophecy might have referred?" F.A.Q. 2004. J.K. Rowling Official Site. 21 May 2006. http://www.jkrowling.com/textonly/en/faq.cfm?ref=aboutthebooks.

4. Rowling, J.K. Harry Potter and the Half-Blood Prince. New York: Scholastic, 2005. p.11.

5. Rowling, J.K. Harry Potter and the Order of the Phoenix. New York: Scholastic, 2003. p.841.

6. ~Mokey. Post #440. "Is There Part of Riddle in Harry? Part II" Great Wizarding Events of the
Twentieth Century
. 4 April 2006. The Leaky Lounge. 21 May 2006. http://www.leakylounge.com/index.php?s=&showtopic=21486&view=findpost&p=769823.

7. Rowling, J.K. Harry Potter and the Half-Blood Prince. New York: Scholastic, 2005. P.500.

8. Rowling, J.K. Harry Potter and the Chamber of Secrets. New York: Scholastic, 1999. p.197.

9. Rowling, J.K. Harry Potter and the Prisoner of Azkaban. New York: Scholastic, 1999. p.339.

10. Ibid. p.343.

11. Ibid. p.339.

12. Ibid. p.341.

13. Rowling, J.K. Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire. New York: Scholastic, 2000. p.215.

14. Rowling, J.K. Harry Potter and the Order of the Phoenix. New York: Scholastic, 2003. p.810.

15. Rowling, J.K. Harry Potter and the Prisoner of Azkaban. New York: Scholastic, 1999. p.375.

16. Rowling, J.K. Harry Potter and the Order of the Phoenix. New York: Scholastic, 2003. p.166.

17. Ibid. p.167.

18. Arianhrod. Post #446. "Is There Part of Riddle in Harry? Part II." Great Wizarding Events
of the Twentieth Century. 4, April 2006. The Leaky Lounge. 21 May 2006. http://www.leakylounge.com/index.php?s=&showtopic=21486&view=findpost&p=770052.

19. The Harry Potter Lexicon. "Horcruxes." Magical Items and Devices. 30, April 2006.
The Harry Potter Lexicon. 21 May 2006. http://www.hplexicon.org/magic/devices/horcruxes.htmlhorcruxes.html.

20. Rowling, J.K. Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire. New York: Scholastic, 2000. p.662.

21. Rowling, J.K. Harry Potter and the Order of the Phoenix. New York: Scholastic, 2003. p.785.

22. Ibid. p.813.

23. Ibid. p.816.

24. Ibid. p.844.

25. Rowling, J.K. Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire. New York: Scholastic, 2000. p.656, 657.

26. Rowling, J.K. Harry Potter and the Half-Blood Prince. New York: Scholastic, 2005. p.603.

27. Ibid. p.503.

28. Rowling, J.K. Harry Potter and the Order of the Phoenix. New York: Scholastic, 2003. p.423.

29. Rowling, J.K. Harry Potter and the Half-Blood Prince. New York: Scholastic, 2005. p.495.

30. Ibid. p.496.

31. Ibid. p.379.

32. Ibid. p.496, 497.

33. Ibid. p.197.

34. Rowling, J.K. Harry Potter and the Chamber of Secrets. New York: Scholastic, 1999. p.336.

35. Rowling, J.K. Harry Potter and the Half-Blood Prince. New York: Scholastic, 2005. p.609.

36. Ibid. p.506.

37. Ibid. p.505.

38. Rowling, J.K. Harry Potter and the Order of the Phoenix. New York: Scholastic, 2003. p.670.

39. Rowling, J.K. Harry Potter and the Prisoner of Azkaban. New York: Scholastic, 1999. p.374.

40. Anelli, Melissa and Emerson Spartz. "The Leaky Cauldron and MuggleNet Interview Joanne
Kathleen Rowling: Part I' The Leaky Cauldron, 16 July 2005. Quick Quotes Quill. 21 May 2006. http://www.quick-quote-quill.org/articles/2005/0705-tlc_mugglenet-anelli-2.htm.

41. Rowling, J.K. Harry Potter and the Half-Blood Prince. New York: Scholastic, 2005. p.548.

42. Ibid. p.26.

43. Rowling, J.K. Harry Potter and the Order of the Phoenix. New York: Scholastic, 2003. p.648.

44. Rowling, J.K. Harry Potter and the Half-Blood Prince. New York: Scholastic, 2005. p.604.

45. Rowling, J.K. Harry Potter and the Sorcerer's Stone. New York: Scholastic, 1997. P.289.

46. Rowling, J.K. Harry Potter and the Prisoner of Azkaban. New York: Scholastic, 1999. p.360.

47. Rowling, J.K. Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire. New York: Scholastic, 2000. p.653.

48. Anelli, Melissa and Emerson Spartz. "The Leaky Cauldron and MuggleNet interview Joanne
Kathleen Rowling: Part Two' The Leaky Cauldron, 16 July 2005. Quick Quotes Quill. 21 May 2006. http://www.quick-quote-quill.org/articles/2005/0705-tlc_mugglenet-anelli-2.htm.

49. Rowling, J.K. "About the Books: What is the significance of Neville being the other boy to
whom the prophecy might have referred?" F.A.Q. 2004. J.K. Rowling Official Site. 21, May 2006. http://www.jkrowling.com/textonly/en/faq_view.cfm?id=84.

50. BBC Christmas Special, British Version. "Harry Potter and Me' BBC, 28 Dec. 2001.
Quick Quotes Quill. 21 May 2006. http://www.quick-quote-quill.org/articles/2001/1201-bbchpandme.htm.

51. Rowling, J.K. Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire. New York: Scholastic, 2000. p.696.

52. Rowling, J.K. Harry Potter and the Sorcerer's Stone. New York: Scholastic, 1997. p.299.

53. Rowling, J.K. Harry Potter and the Half-Blood Prince. New York: Scholastic, 2005. p.56.

54. ~Mokey. Post #3. "How Will Voldemort be defeated? Part II." Unfogging the Future.
4 Nov. 2005. The Leaky Lounge. 21 May 2006. http://www.leakylounge.com/index.php?s=&showtopic=18326&view=findpost&p=519910.

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Rowling, J.K. Harry Potter and the Sorcerer's Stone. New York: Scholastic, 1997.

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”””. Harry Potter and the Prisoner of Azkaban. New York: Scholastic, 1999.

”””. Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire. New York: Scholastic, 2000.

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Finding Hogwarts

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