New Interview with J.K. Rowling for Release of Dutch Edition of “Deathly Hallows”

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Nov 19, 2007

Posted by SueTLC
Uncategorized

As part of the release of the Dutch translation of “Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows,” author J.K. Rowling has given a new interview to the Dutch newspaper “The Volkskrant.” While this interview is in Dutch (link to an elaborate animated page showcasing this interview in the style of a Daily Prophet paper, here), TLC reader Fee sent along a translation of this new interview, where Jo reiterates again she is currently working on a children’s book, and one for adults, but is also enjoying time with her family. The very lengthy interview lightly touches on several topics such as the Weasley family, her family, as well as features some in depth and very frank conversation about religion and religious themes found in the last book. A big spoiler caution is given as events in the last book are detailed. Thanks much to Fee! To read this interview, please scroll down.

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“A part of Harry’s anger is my own.Seven books, seven questions (and an interview)

Who would you rather have as a son, Harry or Ron?
“I’ll take them both! I adore Ron. Ron is the most immature of the three main characters, but in part seven he grows up. He was never strong footed , people see him mostly as Harry’s friend; his mother had actually wanted a girl and in the last book he finally has to acknowledge his weaknesses. But it’s exactly that which makes Ron a man. The others also have such a moment where they truly grow up. Harry when he reacts so fiercely against his former professor Lupin who decides to abandon his family. Hermione when she is forced to choose between Harry and Ron. Hermione never strays of the path; she always keeps her attention focused on the job that must be done.

The Weasleys have all got red hair, just like you in former pictures. Why did you make it blond?
I love red hair. But my hair isn’t naturally red. I’m actually not really sure what my real colour is. It’s something undecided, very boring and very uninteresting.

Do you also find the books a lot better then the movies?
I think that when you are working in such a visual medium certain nuances are lost. There is no other possibility. And the characters in the movie look better than I could have imagined, without any exception. The last film is my favourite. Because the filmmakers really succeeded in capturing the dark aspects of the book.

Who do you resemble?
When I was young I resembled Hermione, although she also has certain traits of my sister.
But I also recognise a lot of Harry in me. A part of Harry’s anger is my own, just like his frustration. He particularly has that in book five. The darkest book of the series where he has lost everything and there is no one who believes him. Iâ€ve, after my first marriage, also experienced such a period in my life where I had the feeling that everything was going wrong, where I was angry at everyone, felt powerless and I couldn’t stand that I wasn’t in control of the situation. But that also gave me the power to fight.

And is there a mother in there who might resemble you?You’re not the Molly Weasley-type.
˜Well, a little bit, I hope. Years ago someone wrote: she characterizes Molly Weasley as a mother who is only at home looking after the children. I was deeply offended, because I till a year before that had also been such a mother who was at home all the time taking care of her child — for the outside world at least. What has lesser status and is more difficult then raising a child? And what is more important? Molly had seven! I think Molly is a terrific woman.

She does commit a murder.
Yes in book seven she kills Bellatrix- she is the only woman on the good side who kills. I saw Molly and Bellatrix standing opposite of each other for a long time; two completely different characters, who each show a very feminine side of love. The pure and protecting love of Molly, and the obsessive, perverse of Bellatrix. Those two feminine types of energy against each other. That was very satisfying to write.

Why is quidditch so much fun?
Because it’s a real woman’s sport. Four balls! They have to go in six different goals. It’s multitasking; it’s what women are good at. They know there is more then one goal in life.

She didn’t exactly get it in her education, but J.K. Rowling (42) is religious. It not only led her to acceptation of mortality, but also to seven mega-bestsellers.The Translation of the last. Harry Potter And The Deathly Hallows, is in bookstores as of tonight. In the British bookstore Waterstone’s lie desperate leaflets with the text “ËœWhat to read after Harry Potter?” But Joanne Rowling herself looks very far from desperate. With her hair in a new white blond style and dressed in jeans with a black velvet jacket, she pours coffee in a hotel room in her hometown of Edinburgh.

Every day I’m relieved it’s done. What comes after this I’m not exactly sure. I’m working on a new children’s book and on a book for adults. One of them will lead to something; that’s how it started with Harry. But for the time being I’m enjoying the time off, and my family.

Here in the hotel a man just passed wearing a Scottish kilt. Does your husband also wear those things?
He has a couple of kilts, yes. And he wears them every so now often, at special occasions.

And does he wear nothing underneath?
ËœNothing at all.That’s why kilts are so much fun, ha,ha!

I’ve brought you two presents. One is from Ien van Laanen, who drew the covers of your books here in Holland; she sends you the originals.
How extremely nice! The Dutch editions I like the best, together with the Americans.

The second is from your Dutch publisher, Jaco Groot.
Jaco often sends me interesting things, he…ah, a rock! But a very special one.

Ten Years ago you gave the up till now only interview with a Dutch journalist. In England you also give only a few. Do you hate interviews?
“No not at all. The reason I rarely give them, is because I actually have not that much to say.

Did you ever consider becoming a journalist? You always enjoyed writing?
I have thought about it. But I think that I was sensible enough to realise that I didn’t have the right temperament. Temperament? Yes, I think so. You’re constantly working on a deadline, you have to produce. With a writer,it’s all about time and loneliness. Journalist are a lot more enjoyable species then writers. A couple of my best friends are journalists.

In your books the species doesn’t come off that easy. Rita Skeeter is particularly nasty.
My friends are normal. One of my ex-boyfriends is a music journalist. The others also write about serious subjects. Rita Skeeter is a typical British produce, We have swamps full of them over here. They wrote a lot of nonsense about me.

In the first book of the series Dumbledore destroys the Philosopher’s stone, the mythical stone who gives the owner eternal life. In the final book Harry does something similar with the resurrection stone, a stone that can bring back the dead. He drops it in the forest.
I used the symbolism of the stone to show that Dumbledore accepts his mortality. Once he realises that its mortality that gives life meaning, he is no longer interested in the philosopher’s stone. Harry goes even further. He not only rejects one, but two of his most powerful weapons. Of the three hallows he acquires in book seven; he only keeps the invisibility cloak. This says a lot about him because, like Dumbledore tells Harry: The true magic of the cloak is that it not only protects the owner, but also other people. Harry doesn’t want the Elder wand, he has never been after power. And he throws the resurrection stone away; just like Dumbledore Harry has made his peace with death.

And you? I think I strife for the same wisdom as Dumbledore and eventually Harry, which means that we must accept our mortality. Even though there are many things in the catholic faith I do not agree with, the idea of a memento moria [sic] I find agreeable. Every day you are aware that you are going to die, you live better; better for you and better for other people.

Do you see death as the end of everything?
No. I lead an intensely spiritual life, and even though I don’t have a terribly clear and structured idea about it, I do believe that after you die some part of you stays alive some way or other. I belief in something as the indestructible soul. But for that subject we should reserve about six hours: It’s something I struggle with a lot.

At the end of book seven Harry has a long conversation with Dumbledore. Who actually is dead but looks better and happier he has ever looked, in a beautiful light space which Harry thinks resembles King’s Cross Station.
You can interpret that conversation in two ways. Either Harry is unconscious, everything Dumbledore tells him he already knew deep inside. In that state of unconsciousness his mind travels further. Dumbledore is in that case Harry’s personification of wisdom; he sees Dumbledore in his head so he can come to certain insights.Or Harry has traveled to a place between life and death. From which Dumbledore and he will leave in opposite directions. Harry also sees there what becomes of Voldemort. He doesn’t exactly know what’s that heap that lies there on the floor in anguish, but he doesn’t want to touch it; He feels it’s a fundamentally evil and perverse creature. It’s the only time that Harry the hero of the vulnerable, is in the presence of someone who’s hurt and doesn’t come to their aid.

During their search Ron, Hermione and Harry talk about Dumbledore as if hears God. They thought that behind his words and actions there was a grand scheme; they are disillusioned when this doesn’t turn out to be the case.
He’s a complex character. I don’t see him as God. I did want that the reader would question Dumbledore’s part in the whole story. We all believed that he was a kind-hearted father figure. And to a certain extent he is. But at the same time he is someone who treats people as puppets; who caries a dark secret from his past and who never told Harry the full truth. I hope that the reader will love him again in the end. But that they love him like he is, including his faults. Is Dumbledore divine? No. He has certain divine qualities though. He is merciful, and in the end he is just.

But Harry is a sort of Jesus. He must die to rid humanity of evil. You made him into a messiah.
Yes, he does have certain messiah traits. I chose that on purpose. He is that one man in a million.. and I say “a man”because with women it’s different who is able to stand up against the power, and who turns down powers control. That makes him the wisest of all.

How can he be like that?
He’s the hero. Harry is just good. Dumbledore says it to him ‘ËœYou are a better man then me.’ As he gets older he will also remain a great man. Because he has learned to be humble.

Were you raised religiously?
I was officially raised in the Church of England, but I was actually more of a freak in my family. We didn’t talk about religion in our home. My father didn’t believe in anything, neither did my sister. My mother would incidentally visit the church, but mostly during Christmas. And I was immensely curious. From when I was 13, 14 I went to church alone. I found it very interesting what was being said there, and I believed in it.When I went to university, I became more critical. I got more annoyed with the smugness of religious people and I went to church less and less. Now I’m at the point where I started: yes, I believe. And yes, I go to the church. A protestant church here in Edinburgh. My husband is also raised protestant, but he comes from a very strict Scottish group. One where they couldn’t sing and talk.

That you yourself go to church only makes the harsh criticism of your work by religious fanatics even more bizarre.
The past ten years there have always been fundamentalists who’ve had problems with my books. The fact that they feature magic and witchcraft is already enough, they despise them. I want nothing to do with fundamentalism, of any sort; it scares me. The Christian fundamentalists are especially active in the United States. One time I have been face to face with such a person. I was in a toy store with my children and I was recognized by a girl who got all excited. The next thing that happened was that a man came up to me and said ‘Aren’t you that Potter woman? After which he brought his face close to me and said very aggressively: ‘I pray for you every evening.’ I should have said that he’d better pray for himself, but I was stunned. It was very frightening.

Your books are about the battle between good and evil. Harry is good. But is Voldemort pure Evil? He is also a victim.
He is a victim, indeed. He is a victim, and he has made choices. He was conceived by force and under the influence of a silly infatuation, While Harry was conceived in love; I think the conditions under which you were born form an important fundament of your existence. But Voldemort chose evil. I’ve been trying to point that out in the books; I gave him choices.

That’s what it constantly about: Do things go the way they are destined, or do you make your own choices?

I believe in free will. Of those that, like us, are in a privileged situation at least. For you, for me; people who are living in western society, people who are not repressed, who are free. We can choose. The things go largely like you want them to go. You control your own life. Your own will is extremely powerful. The way I write about professor Trelawney the particularly inadequate divination teacher, say a lot about how I think about destiny. I did a lot of research into astrology for her character. I found it all highly amusing, but I don’t believe in it.

For a while you worked for Amnesty. Has that influenced your ideas about good and evil?
It’s actually more the other way around. I had assumptions about that and which was why I went to work for Amnesty. I was a research assistant and I worked mainly for Africa. Till I was so foolish to give up my job to go travel after a boyfriend. Voldemort is of course a sort of Hitler. If you read books about megalomania types like Hitler and Stalin, it’s interesting to find how superstitious these people are, with all their power. It’s part of their paranoia, the desire to make themselves bigger then who they really are; they love talking about destiny and fate. I wanted Voldemort to also have those paranoid traits. But the fact that the prophecy from book five becomes true in the end is because Voldemort and Harry chose to let it come true. Not because it is destined to. The Macbeth idea: the witches tell Macbeth what will happen and he then continues to make it happen.

When did you decide to draw a parallel with the Nazis? With Voldemort, who strives for the rule of the”pure blood”, and with Draco Malfoy as a young soldier who is just ?
Immediately I think. II’m not exactly sure. I think The Second World War in anchored in all our minds, right? Draco Malfoy does indeed stand for that type of boy. He wouldn’t have killed Dumbledore , he couldn’t. As long as things are imaginary, okay, but once it becomes reality, the thing becomes more difficult. No, that I gave him that light blonde hair is not because I wanted to make him into a scary Nazi. You give your characters the appearance that you find attractive; that is why I gave my hero dark hair, green eyes and glasses. I’m married to a man who looks like that.

Your film Harry, Daniel Radcliffe, has blue eyes.
They could have given him green contacts, which is very uncomfortable for a young boy, change his eyes digitally, or leave him the way he was. I’m glad they chose the latter.

In your books you paint a picture of the perfect family, namely the Weasley family. Does it resemble the family you were raised in?
No, no. That wasn’t like that at all. I think I longed for it my whole life, that I always wanted such a family. Now I finally have one, although with less children. I found the dynamics of a big family very special; I loved books about the Kennedy’s and that sort of dynasties. I know that in reality it is far less romantic than you think. One of my friends is the oldest of twelve children.

Your mother passed away at 45. Your father is still alive; do you see him often?
No, I don’t see him that much. I see my sister a lot more, even though she’s still angry with me for killing Dobby. She always said she would never forgive me if I killed Dobby or Hagrid. But Hagrid was never in any danger. I already knew before I started writing that he would survive. Because I always had that picture in my head of the huge gigantic Hagrid walking through the forest crying with Harry in his arms.Rons father was actually going to die in book five. I didn’t do it because I felt that Arthur Weasley was the greatest father figure in the books. I couldn’t let Arthur die, I just couldn’t do it. He is the father everyone would wish for. Yes, me too.

All Parents in the book are still together. Did you ever think of writing a nice single mother in? You where one when you started on Harry Potter.
I was planning to have Hermione’s parents separate. But it felt so weird, it didn’t belong to the story. It was a sub story that didn’t go anywhere. Dean Thomas comes from a broken home by the way. But I made a lot of cuts in his storyline. I created this enormous world, for every character I’ve created a background; but I couldn’t use it all. Even I had to make choices. And in the end it’s a children’s world.





81 Responses to New Interview with J.K. Rowling for Release of Dutch Edition of “Deathly Hallows”

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Wow! This must have been very difficult to translate. Thanks so much Fee!

And these are really good questions, I’m impressed!

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I liked what she had to say about Quidditch. Women are much better at mulit-tasking than men. Four balls and six different goals!

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Yet another interview without reveling what house Albus Severus is in…I’M DYING TO KNOW!

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wow this was such an amazzing interview. there was a lot of talk here about stuff we hadnt heard about yet which is great. i still want to hear about dean thomas’ story really badly…maybe in the encyclopedia…

did it annoy anybody else here that dan had blue eyes, when his green eyes are so important in the books?

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Great interview. Thank you so much for translating it for us!

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Some things were definitely interesting and informative, but I really wish journalists would pick more original questions. Who cares why JKR decided to dye her hair?

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It never bothered me what color Dan’s eyes were in the movie, after all it’s the fact that he has his Lily’s eyes that’s important, not what color they are.

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I also enjoy what J.K. said about Qudditch! :D But erm they just had to talk about the Malfoy’s blonde hair tsk tsk and her hair color it’s not important. I’m Dying to know Albie’s house also!!

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I would bet money on Gryffindor, although he felt a bit like a Puff to me. There’s not a smidge of Slyth in that kid, and more importantly he doesn’t want to be there. Plus, he’s Harry Potter’s kid. He’d get bullied.

Enjoyed the interview a lot. Thanks so much!

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Lots of news in one day. I like. Gimme more.

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for some reason i always thought it was implied that Albus was placed in Gryffindor, but i guess its still a question that goes unanswered..

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Well, Harry made it clear to Albus that the decision would be his in the end. That the hat would listen to what the boy wanted. And Albus made it known which house he wished for…Griffyndor.

This was quite a good interview with some interesting questions. Thanks for posting it.

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hahaha “he’d better pray for himself” you go Jo!!

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SueS: Yes, absolutely. This is why I have a problem with the majority of the fandom placing him in Slytherin. He wants to be in Gryffindor. It’s his choice, so he’ll end up where he wants to be.

Shausto-la: I also believe that was the implication.

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Has anyone noticed how the interviews have gotten more and more personal? We’re not getting many questions about the small book details anymore, sadly. If I could ask her anything, I’d ask why the Fat Friar died, and why he chose to stay as a ghost.

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What a great interview – thank you Fee for translating all of this! I’m not sure if I think the questions are getting more personal, Naria, but they seem to me to be getting deeper and deeper all the time. I’m frankly LESS interested in little Albus’ house than I am in the larger world-view Jo brings to the themes of the books. Really really good stuff . . .

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Oh, and the Dutch webpages displaying this interview are really beautiful, and thanks to the English translation, you can almost follow them. Thanks again!

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I’d rather know Teddy’s house than Al’s. I’m not kidding either.

This interview did clear some important over-arching things up and had some lovely commentary- woot!

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I still would like to see how james won lily’s heart, because she didn’t seem to happy with him in snapes wrost memory.

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Thanks, Fee, that made really great reading!

I’m delighted that Jo’s favourite of the movies is Order of the Phoenix – because I think that it was the truest to canon, too.

Fascinating to hear her commentary on the King’s Cross chapter, and on her religious views, and that there seem to be some sadnesses in her own family.

P.S. Of course Albus Severus is in Griffindor! What a question!!

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“I should’ve said pray for yourself.” LOL.

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That was a VERY interesting interview!

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Wow. I wasn’t expect such a detailed interview. By far, it was the best post-DH interview. JKR is so cool. I also loved what she said about Quidditch. LOL

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If JKR really believes in free will, she said indirectly that Gryffindor represents the herectic teachings of the Calvinistic “Church” she belongs to. Her idea of Christianity. She is a heretic. Lily chose not to forgive, which is one of the greatest sins!!! There is NO limitation of forgiveness. Well, let us hope she will learn better.

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Yes, well, going back to the interview. Thanks so much for the translation,Fee. That was a great interview. I’m glad that the reporter asked questions that went into the deeper meanings of the books and the characters.

The more I think about it, the less important all those tiny details are to me. There’s room still for my own imagination of what happens to all the characters after the battle and the epilogue. But I think it helps to know more of Rowling’s own history and her personal views.

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good there is a translation of it on Leaky only I worked my bud off in my boss’ time to get a translation on my own LJ page. could have let another do the donkeywork.

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Poor, poor woman. When she is “Christian” why does she need to tinker her own private “Jesus”. We should pray for her.

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If JKR really believes in free will, she said indirectly that Gryffindor represents the herectic teachings of the Calvinistic “Church” she belongs to. Her idea of Christianity. She is a heretic. Lily chose not to forgive, which is one of the greatest sins!!! There is NO limitation of forgiveness. Well, let us hope she will learn better.

Posted by LookAtTheCross on November 19, 2007 @ 02:33 AM

Ummm.. First of all no house symbolizes any one religion. UNTIL JKR says it does.

Second, and much more importantly, Lilly did not condemn Snape for his actions… She refused to associate with someone who she believed to be two-faced after giving him repeated chances to change. All Snape would have ever had to do was seperate himself from his wicked ways to find a place in her circle of friends. No one could have expected more from her.

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Thank you so much for the translation, FEE!

She made her hair blonde to be more interesting? Aha.

In another interview she talked about Dumbledore´s infatuation with grindelwald. And it´s obviously used in a negative sense as she involuntarily confirms in this interview. So why is everybody so happy she said Dumbledore was gay? regarding her adoration of family-persons she must see homosexuals as morally inferior.

And girls who don´t enjoy raising seven children are like Bellatrix? Or why does Molly need extra praise? I don´t think raising children is something low, but to make such a fuss about it?

Men are allowed to enjoy their life and still pass as good. But imagine Molly said “no You stay at home arthur and I go to the quidditch world cup!” It is so unquestioned that arthur is allowed to have fun that it would appear as selfish if molly explicitly asked for some more time away from the burrow.

And Bellatrix: She waisted that woman´s potential. Bella is not stupid. At some point she had to realise that she was only exploited by voldemort, the whole snape-is-his-favourite seemed to be a very good introduction.

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Fantastic interview. I think this is the best interview yet on JK. It was like reading an extract on her biography! I know everyone is hungry for more JK fiction (me too) but I sure would like to read her autobiograpphy too but I figure we have to wait a very long time. Didnt Sue promise to have a compilation of Jo’s interviews on Leaky? In fact there was a start to it somewhere but I cant find it now.

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umm… does anybody know what does it mean that “He was never strong footed ”?!

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There was still some new info so that was good. The one thing that ticked me off was all the religion talk. You guys, whoever you are, STOP trying to make Harry Potter either parallel or against Christianity. It doesn’t need to be related at all! Ugh, it’s so annoying… I mean… if you made any references to resurrection about Jesus, you may as well say Captain Jack Sparrow was Jesus… hell, all the zombie movies are about Jesus too… ugh. Just stop.

I find it very mean that people are attacking Jo like that… saying things like, “I’m praying for you.” How obnoxious. If I were Jo, I’d probably laugh and say, “Well you’re wasting your time.”

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I do SO wish that those who like to hijack the comments sections to bash Jo for being unChristian (say what??), unfeminist (look who you’re talking about!), or accepting of homosexuality (wickedest thing on the planet, right?!) would just go start their own website somewhere else, and leave off annoying us!

This is a FANsite people! For Fans with a capital F!

If you are unimpressed by Jo’s works, character, values, whatever, please go to the trouble of putting your time, energy and money where your mouths are. Start www.jkrowlingisnotchristian.com or www.jobelievesgayshavearighttoexisteveninliteraturescandal!.com or www.Jk’sherionesshouldbesingleworkingmothersandcrazydeatheaterswithpotential.net.

If you find the HP books and their author to be so jolly awful, go and read something else!

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If Jo is going to hell then all of us are hehehehe

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Cinderella: I think by “never strong-footed,” she means that he was never strong in his self confidence, which is so true. I loved seeing him overcome his insecurities in DH.

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Oh, thanx Kelly, I guessed it’d mean that, but I wasn’t sure. Is that (“strong footed”) a known and used expression? Sorry, English isn’t my first language :)

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Yes, I believe it is an used as an expression.

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I read strong-footed as meaning he was socially clumsy. Ron means well but frequently says and does the wrong thing. He’s a little too impulsive but grows out of all that.

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Why does she talk about harry as “Jesus?” creepy. Why does everything have to do with religion

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Not being strong footed is another way of saying he never had a lot of self belief. It took Ron a long time to believe in himself, but as we all know, he finally started to after he came back and destroyed the horcrux!

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Cool! I really liked this interview. I’m glad she thinks it’s okay Dan has blue eyes(as every true fan knows, it only matters that his eyes are similar to his mother’s eyes, the color isn’t important!) and that she finds OotP the best movie yet(I agree about it capturing the .

Overall a very interesting interview. Thanks.

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The color of Dan’s eyes mean nothing. All they have to do is make Lilly’s eyes blue. The importance is that they look the same, not what that same color is.

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mia: “Why does she talk about harry as “Jesus?” creepy. Why does everything have to do with religion”

She was asked a question and answered it honestly. She didn´t say Harry is Jesus or like Jesus, she said he had a ‘messiahnish’ quality about him. And I think this label is just a means to describe the special quality Harry has. Which, IMO, is a quality that is not restricted to a specific religion or to religious people anyway.

I found this interview very interesting. And of course “I adore Ron.” So do I, Jo. So do I. :)

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Wow, this was a great interview! And i always love it when she talks about Ron. I never really thought about Hermione’s “growing up” moment being when she “choose” harry over Ron. it does make sense though, since she did make the grown up choice of sticking by harry, and showing her loyalty, and knowing that finding the horcruxes are the most important thing, rather than following Ron, just because she loves him. It also explains why she and harry grew apart when ron wasn’t there, hermione resented harry a little for making her chooose between her best friend and the boy she loved. but fortunately it all worked out in the end!

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Excellent interview. One of the best I have read so far.

That journalist was very competent.

I never associated Voldemort with the crying baby in the background. How interesting an association.

And yes, like JKR sister’s, I am very sadened by the amount and choice of people she chose to ” kill ” to show us how cruel war is. I would have been content with them being seriously hurt. But she is the author and it is her choice. It is true that during the Second World War a lot of people that were loved did die. She said in an earlier interview that she wanted the readers to look at life with all its brutality. She made her point.

Thanks for the translation.

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A thousand thanks, Fee!

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Excellent interview, thanks a lot to whoever did the translations. This part:

“Here in the hotel a man just passed wearing a Scottish kilt. Does your husband also wear those things? He has a couple of kilts, yes. And he wears them every so now often, at special occasions.

And does he wear nothing underneath? ËœNothing at all.That’s why kilts are so much fun, ha,ha!”

was so random, so incredibly funny, I laughed my head off.

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Wonderful interview I must say.

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“Its mortality that gives life meaning” Wow, thats really beautiful and brilliant! Thanks so much Fee! This was a great read!

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LookAtTheCross: hahahaha, you are hilarious. do try and remember that you’re talking about a book, oh-forgiving-one.

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Thank you Fee for the translation, very thoughtful of you.

Neil, you’re right, at least we’ll have a lot of friends in the afterlife. Save a butterbeer for me, please?

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Great interview! I liked it that the questions were quite original, they didn’t just repeat what everybody else had asked before. And translating all of it was a great job! Strange though, because the interview must have been in English, as Jo doesn’t speak Dutch, so this must be a double-translation. Pity they didn’t just give us the original interview …

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What does Jo mean when she says the ‘Obsessive Perverse of Bellatrix’? Does she Bella’s obsession with Voldemort or does she mean something slightly different because if I remember in the webchat she did a while back she said Bella loved him. Perverse can mean two things. Perverse as in strange, or perverse as in sexual activity? Jo, please satisfy the Bellamort shippers!

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Hands down, one of the best interviews I’ve read lately. Well, done! Bless you Fee fo rthe translation.

oh and…

www.jobelievesgayshavearighttoexisteveninliteraturescandal !!!!

pottershrink…that was hilarious!!!

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I’d like to add my thanks for the translation. It really was a wonderful read.

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I loved this, Jo is AMAZING!!! She’s so down to earth, you know???

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I enjoyed reading this interview very much. I’m just MAD about JKR!

THANKS SO MUCH for the translation Fee!!!

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That interview was WONDERFUL, definitely one if not my all time favorite of hers so far! I LOVE how deep and personal the questions and answers are getting even though I also LOVE every single word she says about her Potterverse. But as much as I want to know everything she has created for the HP series, I also want to learn more about herself, my idol. I want to know her views and I want to know what she has to say about this and that. She is so incredibly funny and smart. I can’t wait to buy her next book and read it, whatever it will be about. I will always buy her books. And wow, I so hope she will write an autobiography one day. That would be so brilliant. I love Jo. She’s amazing.

Thank you SO MUCH for the wonderful translation.

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P.S. That Dutch website is beautiful!

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Hey, shausto-la, you can find out about Dean Thomas and his family at http://www.jkrowling.org/en/ go to “extra stuff”, then “edits”, and you will find it. I thought it was extremely interesting and satisfying to know :)

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Wow!

J.K.R. should learn to stop destroying what is left of her universe.

Everything she spews it garbage. Canon, for me ended at book five.

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Thanks for the translation, Fee! That was really good interview, good questions.

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Whooo!!!!!!! She likes the American covers the best!!

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I love Jesus

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I agree with naria, the details that flesh out the story line seem to be getting fewer and fewer. Could be JKR is saving them for the encyclopedia, could be she has other things (hubby, kids and other books…) on her mind…could be she is just running out of ideas for the moment.

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Excellent interview…I love how with the right questions we are drawn deeper and deeper into the world of Harry and jk. Jo has soooo much more to offer us from that world and I for one can’t wait to hear it!

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wow awesome!! and ashley it was pretti obvious that al came in gryffindor!

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She likes the american AND DUTCH covers the best. Since I am from Holland, it gives me a lot of pride to be on par with the americans. WOOHOO!

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It always annoyed me that Dan’s eyes in the movie were green because Harry’s eyes were important in the books, and it was the one physical trait he got from his mother. And the eye color does matter because that’s what he got from Lily—the green eyes.

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C’mon guys…don’t attack the Christians, everybody has their own opinion…and everyone should keep their offensive comments to HIS OR HER SELF, religion-based, or not…just stick to the interview, not on making a debate over a comment.

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That was a very satisfying read. Great job in translation too! Blaise Zabini also has a really dysfunctional parent and who would want Bellatrix for a mother?

One other thing: I loved the way Harry came to terms with death and with going back to finish the job he started. I never thought HP was anti Christian; just a romping good read with tons of medieval stuff mixed with the Bible.

heh.

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I’m Thai.

I can’t translate it all, Unfortunately. TToTT

But I like it.

And I Do  want   moreee    details about James and Lily.
I love their story very much. Please Gimme more. _
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I’m so sad that Fred DIE.

So whom’ geoerge marry? I love the twins.

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An excellent read. The journalist’s questions are very deep and Jo’s answers were in turn meaningful and interesting. One of the best interviews that Jo has given, in my opinion. Thanks for the translation!

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Compared to all the interviews of Jo’s that I have read, this interview has brought a lot of deep insight into her vision of the world and where she comes from. Great interview!!! I feel like learning all that we just learned from the interview about her personal life growing up and now has added a new perspective to the hp story, characters and the world overall. It is one of my favorite ways to analyze a great story – by comparing and contrasting it to the authors own life.

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Anyone who is annoyed or frustarated that JK Rowling should mention a topic that angers you (religion) should grow up. Her revealing that aspect of her life was incredibly interesting and was a big contribute to why this interview was so awesome.I don’t know about you, but when I find an interview with JK Rowling, writer of my favortie books of all time, I want to learn more about her, not get a bunch of tiny tiny tiny details that have little to do with the grand story of Harry Potter.

Anyway, as I think that another person has posted, JK inferred that it would be Albus’ choice that would determine his house (Gryffondor), not what the Sorting Hat would decide. I don’t see George getting married, but he’d be a really fun uncle.

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Im surprised she likes the Dutch and American covers the best

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Xander wrote: Im surprised she likes the Dutch and American covers the best.

I’m not. I like them best as well. Although a few of the UK covers (esp.GOF and OOTP) aren’t so bad either.

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I was wondering if things might not be very good between Jo and her father. I noticed that he was absent from the seven-part dedication in Book 7. Just a thought. Interview still brilliant, though and Jo is the best!

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When did that interview actually happen? There’s no date mentioned in the text, is there? I’d need it for a school essay, so it’d be great if someone could tell me! Thanks a lot, Michael

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What a wonderful interview…JK was real and human, I can totally relate to her views! Being raised in a “super religious” family, I would have reacted the same to a fundamentalist in my face…Live and let live…accept the differences, don’t sweat petty stuff, don’t pet sweaty stuff! It’s why I love JKR & HP…!!!!

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