Silencio No More

Apr 17, 2009

Posted by Doris

Carl
On April 9, 2009, this 11 year old young man left his school, went home
and hung himself. Carl Joseph Walker-Hoover had endured endless
teasing at school. His mother begged school officials for help, but
the bullying didn’t stop. His 12th birthday would have been April
17th. You can read more about Carl’s story here.

As a teacher, I show up in a classroom to help my students learn how to make their way out in the world. But for some students, school is not a safe place. I’s not a place to learn; instead it’s a place filled with torturous comments and bullying. For these students, we must not be silent. For these students, we must make sure school is a safe place.

For this reason today is the “Day Of Silence.” This day was originally organized by kids, for kids to help educate students about the affects of bullying against students who are lesbian, gay, bisexual or transsexual. If you are interested in supporting the “Day of Silence,” and you are a student, you can sign up to show your support here. If you are no longer a student and would like to show your support, you can do that here.

For Carl and all of the other students who’ve endured the pain of bullying, we can be silent no more.





9 Responses to Silencio No More

Avatar Imagekendra.dumbledore says: Nice blog Doris! I participated at my school's Day of Silence today! I wore all black and didn't speak all day (it was tough but for an amazing cause). :)Avatar ImageKatetheKeeper says: This is such a sad story. Bullying is one of the worst things that can happen to you as a kid, and I hope that we can make a change in the world.Avatar ImageNargleCatcher says: I heard about this. Its terrible!Avatar ImageDorisTLC says: It is terrible, and if we all work together to educate people and let them know that words can hurt, maybe we can make a difference.Avatar Imagecrikkita says: I am co-advisor of my school's Gay/Straight Alliance, and we had a very successful school-wide observance of the Day of Silence on Friday. The students are so excited to see that their peers and teachers are willing to pay attention to why respect for all individuals is so important. To me, that is a sign of hope.Avatar Imagecrikkita says: I am co-advisor of my school's Gay/Straight Alliance, and we had a very successful school-wide observance of the Day of Silence on Friday. The students are so excited to see that their peers and teachers are willing to pay attention to why respect for all individuals is so important. To me, that is a sign of hope.Avatar Imagemhaeyemhaeye says: I am one of the unfortunate teenager's who have gone through this kind of thing. High school is the most torturing part of growing up and it's not the world. There are far more great things after high school. Far more nice people, far more nicer environment outside. It is sad that respect is lacking from our schools today, but even if you are just one person, you could actually make a stand, and realized who you really are. We could actually start, just like what Doris said, with ourselves and the people around us. Respect everyone, whoever they are, at all cost. And I am pretty sure that it will pay forward, through those teenagers who are struggling through high school or mainly, their lives. It is our choices that shaped us, just like what Dumbledore said, and I have chosen a path that will rise me. I hope other bullied teenagers will realize this. It is hard. But it's a challenge that if faced will have a far more greater reward. I do hope and pray that people around bullied kids will help them to avoid another tragedy like this.Avatar Imageharryplusrachel says: I am another who was bullied terribly all through school until I left for college. I'm straight, though; it would be nice to have a day of silence for kids who were bullied about ANYTHING, not only their sexual orientation. Other things hurt, too, and I'm still on mood-stabilizing medication today because of it. Avatar ImageDobbyWinkyKreacher says: both my children were bullied quite severely their entire school life not just by other kids either. High school was the worst. It has practically destroyed them. left them both with many scars, not just the numerous physical ones. Many horrific things happened to them on a daily basis. The school didn't care. Certainly not the teachers. I could write a book thicker than the seven volumes of Harry Potter and it still would not cover everything that happened. I detest bullies. horrible creatures.

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